Sita Performed Sraddha Cursed River


The majority held belief is that women should not perform Sandhyavandana and death Rites.

I differ from this view.

Phalgu River, cursed by Sita.Image.jpg
Phalgu River.

Great Rishis have been women, like Maiteyi,Gargi,Kathyayani.

These Rishis have composed Veda Sutras, Sukthas.

Vedic wisdom is encapsulated in myriad hymns and 27 women-seers emerge from them.

 

Ghosha, who has a definite human form. Granddaughter of Dirghatamas and daughter of Kakshivat, both composers of hymns in praise of Ashwins, Ghosha has two entire hymns of the tenth book, each containing 14 verses, assigned to her name. The first eulogizes the Ashwins, the heavenly twins who are also physicians; the second is a personal wish expressing her intimate feelings and desires for married life. Ghosha suffered from an incurable disfiguring disease, probably leprosy, and remained a spinster at her father’s house. Her implorations with the Ashwins, and the devotion of her forefathers towards them made them cure her disease and allow her to experience wedded bliss.

The Rig Veda contains about one thousand hymns, of which about 10 are accredited to Maitreyi, the woman seer and philosopher.

Gargi, the Vedic prophetess and daughter of sage Vachaknu, composed several hymns that questioned the origin of all existence. When King Janak of Videha organized a ‘brahmayajna’, a philosophic congress centered around the fire sacrament, Gargi was one of the eminent participants. She challenged the sage Yajnavalkya with a volley of perturbing questions on the soul or ‘atman’ that confounded the learned man who had till then silenced many an eminent scholar. Her question – “The layer that is above the sky and below the earth, which is described as being situated between the earth and the sky and which is indicated as the symbol of the past, present and future, where is that situated?” – bamboozled even the great Vedic men of letters.

One is expected to have Upaveedha to learn the Vedas.

These women composed Veda Sukthas.

They could not have learnt the Vedas without Upaveedha.

Hence they had to perform Sandhyavanda and other Karmic duties.

I have a detailed article on this.

Now there is Reference in the Ramayana and Garuda Purana that Sita offered Pinda to Dasaratha, her father in law at Gaya.

There is reference to the city of Gaya and the Phalgu in the Ramayana in which it says that Sita had cursed the Phalgu River. There is an interesting story and the mythology states that on account of this curse, the Phalgu lost its water, and the river is simply a vast stretch of sand dunes.According to tradition, in the absence of Rama, his wife Sita offered pinda on its banks to Dasharatha father of Rama.

The story goes that Rama, along with his brothers and Sita, came to Gaya to perform the sacred rites for his father, Dasaratha. When the brothers were bathing in the river, Sita was sitting on the banks, playing with the sand. Suddenly, Dasaratha appeared out of the sand, and asked for the Pindam, saying he was hungry. Sita asked him to wait till his sons returned, so that she could give him the traditional Pindam of rice and til. He refused to wait, asking her to give him pindams made of the sand in her hand.

Having no other option, she gave him the Pindam he desired with five witnesses – the Akshaya Vatam, the Falguni River, a cow, a Tulsi plant and a Brahmin. Soon, Rama returned and started the rituals. In those days apparently, the ancestors would arrive in person to collect their share, and when Dasaratha did not appear, they wondered why. Sita then told them what had happened, but Rama could not believe that his father would accept pindams made of sand. Sita now mentioned her witnesses, and asked them to tell Rama the truth.

Among the five, only the Akshaya Vatam took her side and told the truth, while the others lied, trying to take Rama’s side. In her anger, Sita cursed all of them thus: the Falguni river henceforth would have no water at Gaya; the Cow would no longer be worshipped from the front as all others are- only its backside would be worshipped; there would be no more Tulsi plants at Gaya and the Gaya Brahmins would never be satisfied, they would always be hungry and crave more and more. She then blessed the Akshaya Vatam saying that all who came to Gaya would perform the Pinda pradaanam at the Akshaya Vatam too.

Sri Sita is said to have performed Sandhyavandanam including Dhyaanam and Japam (Vide page 97 of Notes on AyOdhya KhaaNDam of Srimad Vaalmiki Ramayanam by Sri C.R.Srinivasa Iyengar)

View of Kanchi Acharya.

I said that the twice-born must perform sandhyavandana with the well-being of women and other jatis in mind. I also explained why all samskaras are not prescribed for the fourth varna. Now we must consider the question of women, why they do not have such rituals and samskaras.

Even though we perform the punyaha-vacana and namakarana of newborn girls and celebrate their first birthday, we do not conduct their caula and upanayana nor the other samskaras or vows laid down for brahmacarins. Of course, they have the marriage samskara. But in other rites like sacrifices the main part is that of the husband, though she (the wife) has to be by his side. In aupasana alone does a woman have a part in making oblations in the sacred fire.

  1. Why is it so?
  2. The rites performed before a child is born are intended for the birth of a male child (niseka, pumsavana, simanta). Does it mean, as present-day reformers and women’s libbers say, that Hindu women were downgraded and kept in darkness?
  3. What reason did I mention for the fourth varna not having to perform many of the samskaras?

That these were not necessary considering their vocations and the fact that they can work for the welfare of the world without the physical and mental benefits to be derived from the samskaras. If they also spend their time in Vedic learning and in sacrifices, what will happen to their duties? So most of the samskaras are not necessary for them. They reach the desire goal without these rites by carrying out their duties.

“Svakarmana tam abhyarcya siddhim vindati manavah“, so says the Gita. I have spoken to you about this earlier.

Just as society is divided according to occupations and the samskaras are correspondingly different, so too there are differences between men and women in domestic life. Running a household means different types of work, cooking, keeping the house clean, bringing up the children, etc. By nature women can do these chores better than men. If they also take an active part in rituals, what will happen to such work? Each by serving her husband and by looking after her household becomes inwardly pure.

In truth three is no disparity between men and women, nor are women discriminated

against as present-day reformers allege.

Work is divided for the proper maintenance not only of the home but the nation on the whole; and care has been taken not to have any duplication.

There is no intention of lowering the status of any section in this division of labour.

The body, in the case of certain people, is meant to preserve the mantras and there are samskaras which have the purpose of making it worthy of the same.

Why should the same rituals be prescribed for those who do not have such tasks to carry out?

Glassware to be sent by railway parcel is specially taken care of since it is fragile. Even greater care is taken in dispatching kerosene or petrol. If the same precautions are not taken in transporting other goods, does it mean that they are poorly thought of?

Citation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalgu

http://www.kamakoti.org/hindudharma/part18/chap2.htm

https://thapas.wordpress.com/2012/03/10/women-performing-veda-samskaaras-by-kanchi-mahaswami/

 

Obama Carries Hanuman In Pocket


Indians, as a hangover of British legacy and English, tend to give credence to things endorsed by the fair-skinned, be it their own Scriptures, The Vedas or about their Temples.

They need a Max Mueller to remind them about the greatness of the Vedas, though he was Missionary bent on disinformation about Hinduism.

I am providing the following information in the hope that some Westophiles( If some can write as Anglophiles, I can write Westophile) and Sely syled Rationalists like Karunanidhi and Veeramani,would think twice before ridiculing Hanuman .

 

President Barack Obama carries a small statue of Lord Hanuman as his lucky charm, since his days as a candidate for the US Presidency.

Obama Carries Hanuman as his Lucky charm.image.jpg
US President Obama Carries Hanuman as his Lucky charm.

A recent photo posted on Time’s White House Photo of the Day collection shows the first ever Black-American nominee of a major US party for the Presidential elections carries with him a bracelet belonging to an American soldier deployed in Iraq, a gambler’s lucky chit, a tiny monkey god and tiny Madonna and child.

That “tiny monkey god,” of course, appears to be a statue of the Hindu monkey god, Hanuman, says the posting but editors and the photographer has not identified it as such.’

Hanuman Idol for Obama.

Indians Present Hanuman Idol to President Obama.Image.jpg
Indians Present Hanuman Idol to President Obama.

A group of Indians are planning to present a statue of the revered Indian monkey God, Hanuman, to Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama.

The group decided to order the idol after they read a magazine report saying that Mr Obama carried a good luck ‘monkey king’ charm.

They say that a Barack Obama victory would be good for India.

Hindus revere monkeys which they believe are descendents of the monkey God Hanuman.

The two-foot tall, 15kg gold-polished, brass idol has been made as a present for Mr Obama because “he will be good for India if he becomes the next president,” according to Brij Mohan Bhama, leader of the group.

Mr Bhama belongs to the ruling Congress party and runs a textile mill in the western city of Mumbai.

* I understand that this has been delivered to Obama.

Citation.

 

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2008-06-10/news/27716291_1_monkey-god-hanuman-lucky-chit

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7468662.stm

Image Credit.

http://beforeitsnews.com/alternative/2014/06/obama-and-his-use-of-magic-video-cult-sweeps-world-today-so-free-yourself-2970996.html

No Cremation Ground Devotees Not Allowed Taliparamba Shiva


Three is a Temple in Srivanchiyam where the Naivedya for Shiva is done after a corpse has been burnt in the Cremation ground in front of  the temple.

Please read my post  on this ‘Where Corpses Burn’.

Taliparamba Temple.jpg
Taliparamba Temple.

There is a Temple in Kerala where the Shiva Linga was ordered to be installed in a place where there is no cremation ground!

The Rajarajeswara temple is in Taliparamba, Kerala.

I would like hear from people from Taliparamaba where the cremation ground exists in Taliparamba.

Another unique feature is that the Devotees are not allowed to offer Namaskara, Prostrations before the Deity, in the  Namaskara Mantapa, they are not allowed inside this Mantapa.

The reason is that Lord Rama offered Namaskara to Shiva here and as a mark of respect to Lord Rama, this custom is followed.

 

Legend.

Taliparamba is among the 108 ancient Kerala temples dedicated to Shiva.

Taliparamba is regarded as one of the ancient Shakti Peethams.

The Shiva Linga here is believed to be several thousands of years old. Legend has it that Shiva gave three sacred Shiva Lingas to Parvati/Sati for worship.

One sage, Maandhata propitiated Lord Shiva with intense prayers. Shiva was so pleased that he presented one of the Shiva Lingas to him with the injunction that it should be installed only at a place where there was no cremation ground. The sage, after searching all over, found Taliparamba the most sacred spot where he installed the Shiva Linga.

After his death the Linga disappeared into the earth. Then his son Muchukunda offered similar prayers to Shiva and got a second Shiva Linga, which too disappeared in course of time. Centuries passed. The third Shiva Linga was handed down to Satasoman, a king of Mushaka/Kolathiri/Chirakkal Royal Family, who then ruled the region. He was an ardent devotee of Shiva. On the advice of sage Agastya, he prayed to Lord Siva, who granted him the Shiva Linga. The king installed it in the present temple built by him. However, many legends associated with the Temple, claim Agastya Himself as installing the ShivaLinga (which is believed as per those legends to be a ‘Jyothirlingam’).

* We have Spatha Vidnaga Sthalas in Tamil Nadu, where the legend runs on similar lines.Rfer my Post on Sapthavidanga Sthalas

It is believed that Sri Rama during his victorious return from Lanka stopped here to offer worship to Lord Shiva. In honor of His presence, devotees are not allowed into the namaskara mandapam even today.

Lord Shiva worshiped in this sacred temple is known as Sree Rajarajeswara, which means the Emperor of Emperors — the Lord Supreme. The name signifies the supreme transcendental power in the background of mysterious drama of the boundless universe. That power is invoked here as Lord Rajarajeshwara. Devotees address the lord with such royal appellations as Perumthrikovilappan, Perum-chelloorappan and Thampuraan Perumthrikkovilappan.

The Jyothirlingam in the shrine in vibrant with spiritual power that exerts an enriching influence both on the material and spiritual levels of the earnest devotees. The celebrated ancient sage Agasthya Maharishi is associated with the installation of the Jyothirlingam in the shrine.

Temple Timings.

Pooja / Prayer timings: The temple opens at 4 am and remains closed in the afternoon from 12 to 5.

Wednesday, the day when the lingam was installed, is the most important day for prayer instead of Monday.

Festivals: Shivratri, Puthari, a festival of the harvesting season; Karkadaka Sankramam (July) and Nira are some of the auspicious days celebrated in the temple with pomp and festivities.

Codes and guidelines: Men are allowed to enter the shrine at any time, but woman are allowed only after 8 PM. Non Hindus are not allowed to enter the temple. Mundu is the dress code for men.

Cloak room: One has to deposit their purse and other belongings in the cloak room outside. Photography is prohibited in the temple.

How To Reach.

By Air.

Taliparamba111 km away

Bajpe Airport (IXE)Mangalore, Karnataka

Taliparamba100 km away

Calicut International Airport (CCJ)Kozhikode, Kerala

Train.

Taliparamba does not have an train station. Nearest option is Kannapuram.

Taliparamba9 km away

Kannapuram (KPQ)Kannapuram, Kerala

Taliparamba12 km away

Payangadi (PAZ), Payangadi, Kerala

By Bus.
Available from major cities of India, especially in Kerala,

Citation and Reference.

 

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajarajeshwara_Temple#Legends_and_history

 

Naval Depatment Of Tamils Ancient India


As I write on the spread of Hinduism, Sanatana Dharma, I wondered about two points.

There is no doubt that the Sanatana dharma of Hindus spread far and wide throughout the world is indisputable considering the archeological finds found throughout the world indicating the presence of Sanatana Dharma.

Two questions remain.

How did people travel so far?

Secondly how did they fight the wars with the foreign invaders when it happened?

Though Puranas and Ithihasa speak of what appears to be beyond Human capacity of crossing the ocean by flying, there ae references that the ancient knew about Ships and warfare.

While one may question as to how Hanuman could fly over  the Ocean to Lanka, Valmiki in the same breath talks of ships!

When Hanuman was crossing the ocean to Lanka, he is compared to a ship tossed by winds on the high seas. Sugriva speaks of Sumatra, Java and even the Red Sea, when sending forth his monkey hosts in quest of Sita.

This only means that though the people during Ramayana knew of ships, yet Hanuman chose to fly.

Indian Ship landing 543 BC
Ships Landing of Prince Vijaya in Sri Lanka – 543 BC from Ajanta Frescos.
Ajanta painting of a later date depict horses and elephants aboard the ship which carried Prince Vijaya to Sri Lanka.
(source: India Through the ages – By K. M. Panikkar).

The Rig Veda mentions “merchants who crowd the great waters with ships”.

The Ramayana speaks of merchants who crossed the sea and bought gifts for the king of Ayodhya.

Manu legislates for safe carriage and freight by river and sea.

In some of the earliest Buddhist literature we read of voyages ‘out of sight’ of land, some lasting six months or so.

“There was also extensive intercourse of India with foreign countries, including the Mediterranean lands and the African continent, naturally led to piracy on the waters. There then arose the need for the protection of sea-borne trade, and we are told that “at the outset the merchant vessels of India carried a small body of trained archers armed with bows and arrows to repulse the attacks of the pirates, but later they employed guns, cannon and other more deadly weapons of warfare with a few wonderful and delusive contrivances.”

-William Vincent pp. 457). These are probably the beginnings of the ancient Indian navy. in The Commerce and Navigation of the Ancients In the Indian Ocean.

The navy is one of the angas (part) of the complete army. Examples of ships being used for military purposes are not lacking. When Vidura scented danger to Kunti’s five sons, he made them escape to the forest with their mother, crossing the Ganges in a boat equipped with weapons having the power of withstanding wind and wave.(Mahabharata Shanti Parva 59,41)

 

Darius launched a maritime expedition under Skylax of Caryanda to the Indus Delta, and during Alexander’s time, again, we read of the people of the Punjab fitting out a fleet. We have the testimony of Arrian to show that the Xathroi (Kshatri), one of the Punjab tribes, supplied Alexander during his return voyage with thirty oared galleys and transport vessels which were built by them.

-Herodotus 517 BC, India and Its Invasion by Alexander p. 156.

 

By regular practice one becomes an adept in fighting from chariot, horses, elephants and boats, and a past-master in archery.”

-Kamandaka (XVI, 50)

 

“Boats should be employed for military purposes when the theatre of hostilities abounded in water.

(Manu Samhita Vii 192)

 

‘The Admiralty as a department of the State may have been a creation of Chandragupta but there is evidence to show that the use of ships and boats was known to the people of the Rg Veda. ”

Early History of India, Vincent Smith P.133.

This exploit you achieved, Asvins in the ocean, where there is nothing to give support, nothing to rest upon, nothing to cling to, that you brought Bhujya, sailing in a hundred oared ship, to his father’s house.

Further on in the Veda, this same vessel is described as a plava which was storm-proof and which presented a pleasing appearance and had wings on its sides. Another reference informs us that Tugra dispatched a fleet of four vessels (Catasro navah) among which was the one referred to above. We may infer from these passages that the Asvins were a great commercial people having their home in a far-off island, and that their ruler Tugra maintained a fleet in the interests of his State. There are also other references in the Rg Veda to show that the ancient Indians were acquainted with the art of navigation. For instance, Varuna is credited with a knowledge of the ocean routes along which vessels sailed.

The Baudhayana Dharmasastra speaks of Samudrasamyanam and interprets it as nava dvipantaragamanam, i.e. sailing to other lands by ships. This very term occurs in the navadhyaksa section of the Kautaliya Arthasastra.

The Puranas have several references to the use of ships and boats. The Markandeya Purana speaks of vessels tossing about on the sea. The Varahapurana refers to the people who sailed far into the ocean in search of pearls and oysters. The ships floated daily on the shoreless, deep and fearful waters of the ocean. We are on firmer ground when we see in the Andhra period their coins marked with ships. The ship building activities were great on the east coast, and the Coromandel coast in particular. From this period to about 15th century A.D. there was a regular intercourse with the islands of the Archipelago most of which were colonized and also with ancient America right across the Pacific as testified to us by the archaeological finds and inscriptions in those parts.

The Pali books of Sri Lanka like the Mahavamsa refers to ocean going vessels carrying 700 passengers. Such frequent intercourse and colonization through the ages could not have been effected without a powerful fleet.

 

 

“Turning to the history of South India, we have evidence to show that the country had trade and culture contacts with foreign countries like Rome in the west and Malay Archipelago and South east Asia in the east. Yavana ships laden with articles of merchandise visited the west coast frequently. There was active foreign trade between Tamil Indian and the outer world at least from the time of Soloman, i.e. about 1000 B.C. Roman historians refer to the commercial intercourse that existed between Rome and South India. In the first century before Christ we hear of a Pandyan embassy to Augustus Caesar. (refer to Periplus translated by Schoff p. 46).

The Sangam classics point to the profession of pearl-diving and sea-fisheries on a large scale. We hear of shipwrecks of the early Tamils saved now and then by Manimekhalai, the goddess of the sea.

(Note: ancient Tamil tradition traces its origins to a submerged island or continent, Kumari Kandam, situated to the south of India. The Tamil epics Shilappadikaram and Manimekhalai provide glorious descriptions of the legendary city and port of Puhar, which the second text says was swallowed by the sea.

 

As in the case of Dwaraka, (please refer to chapter on Dwaraka and Aryan Invasion Theory), initial findings at and off Poompuhar, at the mouth of the Cauvery, show that there may well be a historical basis to this legend: apart from several structures excavated near the shore, such as brick walls, water reservoirs, even a wharf (all dated 200-300 B.C.), a few years ago a structure tantalizingly described as a “U-shaped stone structure” was found five kilometers offshore, at a depth of twenty-three meters; it is about forty meters long and twenty wide, and fishermen traditionally believed that a submerged temple existed at that exact spot. If the structure is confirmed to be man-made (and not a natural formation), its great depth would certainly push back the antiquity of Puhar.

 

Only more systematic explorations along Tamil Nadu’s coast, especially at Poompuhar, Mahabalipuram, and around Kanyakumari (where fishermen have long reported submerged structures too) can throw more light on the lost cities, and on the traditions of Kumari Kandam, which some have sought to identify with the mythical Lemuria…

We have the account of a Cera King conquering the Kadamba in the midst of sea waters. The Cera King Senguttuvan had a fleet with which he defeated the Yavanas who were punished with their hands being tied behind their backs and the pouring of oil on their heads. The Cholas also maintained a strong fleet with which they not only invaded and subjugated Lanka but also undertook overseas expeditions. Among the conquests of Rajaraja, Lanka was one, and his invasion of that island finds expression in the Tiruvalangadu plates, where it is described as follows:

“Rama built, with the aid of the monkeys, a causeway over the sea and then slew with great difficulty the king of Lanka by means of sharp-edged arrows. But Rama was excelled by this (king) whose powerful army crossed the ocean in ships and burnt the king of Lanka.”

 

Citation.

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/vimanas/esp_vimanas_11b.htm

You may find interesting material  in the above mentioned site

 

Ramayana Describes Cook Lake Pukaki Pacific Ring Of Fire New Zealand


I have mentioned in an earlire post , while wrting on the references found in the Ramayana, that if one wahents to find where the Geographical locations of the world were, one has to refer Sugreeva’s direction to this Vanara Sena, charged with the mission of looking out fot Sita, who was abducted.

His directions are so clear that we can even today identify the Nazca Lines, Peru, Siberian cities, Java,Australia to refer to a few.

Now to the reference of New Zealand in the Ramayana by Valmiki.

I have earlier written on the Maori Indins of New Zealand being influenced by Sanatan Dharma and how ancient tribes of Australia engage themselves in the Third Eye dance of Shiva.

While directing the Vanara Senas, Sugreeva advises them, after crossing Java, to look for a sea with red and yellow water.

Island in Coral Sea,Image. Lady Musgrave Island.jpg
Lady Musgrave island, Coral Sea.

This is the Coral Sea of Australia.

 

Valmiki describes that after crossing this huge island (Shalmali Dwipa/Austalia), Mount Rishabha (ऋषभ)  looks like a ‘White cloud with a pearly necklace of waves rippling on the shores below‘.
Near to that is the Sudharshana Lake with ‘silvery lotuses which have fibrils of gold‘ and where ‘kingly swans scamper around‘.
Valmiki might be referring to Mount Cook & Lake Pukaki of New Zealand,

Mount Cook.Image.jpg
Mount Cook New Zealand.
Described by Valmiki in Ramayana

 

Lake Pukaki reflects Mt.Cook.jpg
Lake Pukaki and Mountain Cook, New Zealand

 

Ring of Fire.

Ring of Fire.Image.jpg
The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean. Deep ocean trenches and high mountain ranges are also part of the Ring of Fire.
Map courtesy USGS

* valmiki correctly describes as resembling a ‘Horse Face’

The Ring of Fire is an area where a large number of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur in the basin of the Pacific Ocean. In a 40,000 km (25,000 mi) horseshoe shape, it is associated with a nearly continuous series of oceanic trenches, volcanic arcs, and volcanic belts and/or plate movements. It has 452 volcanoes and is home to over 75% of the world’s active and dormant volcanoes.[1] It is sometimes called the circum-Pacific belt.(wiki)

 

Valmiki describes the Ring of Fire thus,

Valmiki says that the ‘vanaras’ would pass the ‘fantastically refulgent fire resembling the face of a horse’ (Verse 4-48).

tataH paaNDura meghaabham kSiiraudam naama saagaram || 4-40-43
gatvaa drakSyatha durdharSaa muktaa haaram iva uur.hmibhiH |

43b, 44a. dur dharSaa= oh, unassailable [vanara-s – Sugreeva’s addressing]; tataH gatvaa= from there, having gone; paaNDura megha aabham= whitish, cloud, similar in shine; uurmibhiH= with [swaying ripples; muktaa haaram iva= which will be like swaying – pearl, necklaces, like; kSiira udam= milk, having as waters – milk ocean; naama saagaram= with that – name, an ocean; drakSyatha= you shall see.

“Oh, unassailable vanara-s, on your going therefrom you shall see the milk ocean, which will be like a whitish cloud in its shine, and even like a pearly necklace while her ripples will be swaying. [4-40-43b, 44a]

Here some more Indian Mythological oceans like sarpi, dadhi etc., are not said. The mythological oceans are lavaNa, ikshu, suraa, sarpi, dadhi, dugdha jalaiH samam salt, sugar-cane juice, ghee [clarified butter, curds, milk – oceans. Further, some islands like Kusha, Kraunca etc., are also unsaid. Though all are not explicitly listed in the text, the vanara-s are supposed to search those unsaid oceans and islands implicitly.

tasya madhye mahaa shveto R^iSabho naama parvataH || 4-40-44
divya gandhaiH kusumitai aacitaiH ca nagaiH vR^itaH |
saraH ca raajataiH padmaiH jvalitaiH hema kesaraiH || 4-40-45
naamnaa sudarshanam naama raajaha.msaiH samaakulam |

44b, 45, 46a. tasya madhye= in its, centre [of milk ocean]; divya gandhaiH= with heavenly, fragrances; kusumitaiH= [ever flowered; aacitaiH= closely [growing]; nagaiH vR^itaH= with trees, surrounded with; R^iSabhaH naama= Rishabha, named; mahaan parvataH= colossal, mountain; shvetaH= white – mountain; jvalitaiH hema kesaraiH= with sparkling, golden fibrils; raajataiH padmaiH= with silver [like, lotuses [- which is replete with]; raaja hamsaiH samaakulam= with kingly, swans, scampered; naamnaa sudarshanam naama= by name, as Sudarshana, renowned as; saraH ca = lake, also; [assit= are there.]

“In the centre of that milk ocean there is a white mountain of colossal size, named Rishabha, surrounded with closely growing trees ever flowered with flowers of heavenly fragrance. And a lake renowned as Lake Sudarshana is also there, which is replete with silvery lotuses whose fibrils are golden in sparkle, and in which kingly swans will be scampering about. [4-40-44b, 45, 46a]

vibudhaaH caaraNaa yakSaaH kinnaraaH sa apsaro gaNaaH || 4-40-46
hR^iSTaaH samadhigacChanti naliniim taam rira.msavaH |

46b, 47a. vi budhaaH= supreme, intellectuals [gods, caaraNaa yakSaaH kinnaraaH= caarana-s, yaksha-s, kinnaraa-s; sa apsaraH gaNaaH= with, apsara, hosts of; hR^iSTaaH= gladly; riramsavaH= to enjoy frolicking – frolicsomely; taam naliniim = that, lotus-lake [Sudarshana Lake]; samadhigacChanti= they will be arriving at.

“To enjoy frolicking in that Sudarshana Lake the gods, caarana-s, yaksha-s, kinnaraa-s and hosts of apsara females will be arriving at that lotus-lake gladsomely. [4-40-46b, 47a]

kSiirodam samatikramya tato drakSyatha vaanaraaH || 4-40-47
jalodam saagaram shiighram sarva bhuuta bhayaavaham |

47b, 48a. vaanaraaH = oh, vanara-s; kSiirodam samatikramya= milky ocean, on crossing over; sarva bhuuta bhayaavaham= for all, beings, frightening; jala= sof-water; udam saagaram= as waters, ocean [ocean with soft water; tataH shiighram drakSyatha= then, immediately, you shall see.

“And on crossing over the milky ocean, oh vanara-s, then you will be immediately seeing the soft-water ocean which will be frightening to all beings. [4-40-47b, 48a]

tatra tat kopajam tejaH kR^itam hayamukham mahat || 4-40-48
asya aahuH tan mahaavegam odanam sa caraacaram |

48b, 49a. tatra= there; tat kopa jam= that, from anger, originated – originated from the anger of Aurasa; mahat= fantastic one; haya mukham = horse, face; tejaH kR^itam= by refulgent Fire, made – by the anger of Aurasa; sa cara a caram= with, mobile, not, mobile [sessile beings]; mahaa vegam= highly speedy [waves of ocean]; tat= that [water of ocean]; asya odanam aahuH= its [to the Fire,] victuals, said to be.

“There exists a fantastically refulgent Fire in the form of Horse’s Face that originated from the anger of Sage Aurasa. The victuals to that Fire is said to be that highly speedy waves of the ocean, together with all of the mobile and sessile beings of the world at the close of each Era. [4-40-48b, 49a]

Aurasa derives from the word uuru, meaning ‘the thigh.’ The mother this sage hid him under her thigh when some kings came to kill, as such he got this name. Then with vengeance this sage started to burn the world with his yogic fire, but his manes came to him to pacify and asked him to release his yogic fire in oceanic water. When he did so, that fire remained underwater, ready to emerge from a cavity like that of a she-horse’s mouth, from beneath the ocean from the South Pole. This fire is called vaDaba agni, orbaDaba anala , referred here as Horse’s Face. At the time of yuga anta, End of Era, that fire emerges out, and the whole creation, with all its sessile and mobile beings, becomes its fuel, as said in next verse. This episode is detailed in aadi parva , First Canto, Maha Bharata.

Reference and Citation.

Valmiki Ramayana Kishkinta Kanda Sarga 40