Eleven Vedic Brahmin Law Makers Of Gotra Smritis

Relevant portions of the Vedic Duties which would suit the individual’s disposition and also a group with the same disposition were organised and presented as Smritis.

There are quite a few number of Smritis to be followed .

Though all the Smritis state from the Vedas, and each one of them is an authority for all the Varnas, it is traditional for some groups to follow a specific Smriti…Kashtriyas, Vaisyas and Sudras are to follow Manu Smriti.

Though Brahmins are expected to follow Manu Smriti, it is traditional to follow eleven Smritis, including Manu Smriti.

Brahmin Bashing Justified?

Yet people vilify Brahmins of practicing Untouchability.

Despite my vigorous checking, I am yet to find a Brahmin being accused of practicing Untouchability and charged under the Law!

Other Communities have been named.
Then the stock answer, is that Brahmins consider as Theettu, and wash themselves or the place where they( Sc/ST) sat.

This is a matter of.personal habit, though some smritis suggest this and they are not being followed by every one,

Corruption In India Reason Hinduism?Hindu Baiting

Which is true?

The name SHANTONU SEN is Bengali.

Is he a Naturalized New Zealander or a pseudonym for India/Hindubaiter/

As this article seems to have been written, in the Catherine Mayo style, to denigrate Hindu culture rather than addressing the issue of corruption, let me answer point by point.

Corruption in India is a cultural aspect. Indians seem to think nothing peculiar about corruption. It is everywhere.

Indians tolerate corrupt individuals rather than correct them.

No race can be congenitally corrupt.

But can a race be corrupted by its culture?

To know why Indians are corrupt, look at their patterns and practices.

Brian from Godzone

Indians are Hobbesian
(Culture of self interest)

Religion is transactional in India.

Indians give God cash and anticipate an out-of-turn reward.

Such a plea acknowledges that favours are needed for the undeserving.

In the world outside the temple walls, such a transaction is named “bribe”.

A wealthy Indian gives not cash to temples, but gold crowns and such baubles.

His gifts can not feed the poor. His pay-off is for God. He thinks it will be wasted if it goes to a needy man.