Earthquake Japan 7.3 Helplines

Japan has been hit by an earthquake of 7.3 Scale on Richter off Fukushima, Prefecture coast to-day and Tsunami Alert has been issued.

Japan’s meteorological agency said the quake was an aftershock of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami that struck the same area in 2011, killing about 19,000 people and devastating the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant.

Tsunamis of up to 40 centimeters (15 inches) were reported Saturday at four areas along the coast, but a tsunami advisory was lifted less than two hours after the quake.

Japanese television images of harbors showed calm waters. The quake hit at 2:10 a.m. Tokyo time (1710 GMT) about 290 kilometers (170 miles) off Fukushima, and it was felt in Tokyo, some 300 miles (480 kilometers) away.

“It was fairly big, and rattled quite a bit, but nothing fell to the floor or broke. We’ve had quakes of this magnitude before,” Satoshi Mizuno, an official with the Fukushima prefectural government’s disaster management department, told The Associated Press by phone. “Luckily, the quake’s center was very far off the coast.”

Mizuno said the operator of the troubled Fukushima plant, Tokyo Electric Power Co., said no damage or abnormalities have been found.

Japan’s meteorological agency issued a 1-meter (3-foot) tsunami advisory for a long stretch of Japan’s northeastern coast, and put the quake’s magnitude at 7.1. The U.S. Pacific Tsunami Warning Center did not post warnings for the rest of the Pacific.

Earthquake and tsunami warnign ,Fukushima, japan
Tsunami Warning for Japan


Helpline for Foreigners in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures

 There are four special counselling departments: counselling service in foreign languages, domestic violence counseling service for women, sexual minority counselling service as well as suicide department.

This is the new hotline dedicated to the areas the earthquake strike in 2011.
You can call it from anywhere in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefecture.

Toll Free: 0120-279-226

Wait after the Japanese guidance, then please press 2.
You will be directed to the general counselling service hotline for non-Japanese speakers.

For more information please refer to the link below:
Helpline for Foreigners in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures 

This hotline can be used for various languages such as English, Chinese, Korean and Tagalog.

Helpline for Foreigners in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures(PDF)



48Foot Tsunami Video.

48-foot wall of water hit Japanese nuclear power plant…

Video shows tsunami crashing into Fukushima nuclear site
By Brian Walker and Matt Smith, CNN
April 9, 2011 4:02 p.m. EDT
Click to play
48-foot wave hits nuclear plant

NEW: Video shows the March 11 tsunami swamping the plant
Nuclear plants will now need 2 backup generators per reactor
Engineers examine rising water levels in reactor No. 3 condenser
Nitrogen concentrations boosted in reactor No. 1

Tokyo (CNN) — A brief video clip released Saturday captures the massive tsunami that crippled Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi power plant, showing the wall of water that slammed into the facility and created an ongoing crisis.

The video shows the giant wave generated by the historic March 11 earthquake crashing over the plant’s seawall and engulfing the facility, with one sheet of spray rising higher than the buildings that house the plant’s six reactors. Tokyo Electric Power, the plant’s owner, told reporters the wall of water was likely 14 to 15 meters (45 to 48 feet) higher than normal sea levels — easily overwhelming the plant’s 5-meter seawall.

The footage was was shot from high ground about 900 meters south of the plant by a worker who evacuated before the tsunami hit, the Tokyo Electric Power Company said in releasing the six-second clip.

Radioactivity US Concerns.In Japan, One Million Times Greater. Videos.

Radioactivity in Salt from sea   may pose a problem.

Also Radioactivity at 10 million times higher is very serious.


Neighbours take fright over radiation threat.

* Expert says levels not dangerous

* Tourist arrivals plunge in peak season

* Sparks debate over nuclear safety in the U.S. (Adds TEPCO statement, trace radioactivity detected in China)

By Kiyoshi Takenaka and Yoko Nishikawa

TOKYO, April 7 (Reuters) – Japan’s neighbours sounded increasingly alarmed over the risk of radiation from the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, while figures showed the number of foreign visitors to the country had slumped during what should be the peak tourist season.

The world’s worst nuclear disaster in 25 years is also raising concern over safety in the United States, which has more atomic reactors than any other country, especially at one plant which is similar to the one in Fukushima wrecked by last month’s 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami.

Engineers, who sealed a leak this week that had allowed highly radioactive water into the sea, are now pumping nitrogen into one reactor to prevent the risk of a hydrogen gas explosion, and want to start the process in another two reactors.

Japan Plugs Radioactive Water Leak.


Plugging away: No highly radioactive water is seen leaking early Wednesday from the reactor 2 storage pit (top), where it was seen pouring from a crack Tuesday afternoon (bottom). KYODO PHOTO



Japanese workers have stopped the leak of radioactive water from the earthquake-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant, but the situation is still far from under control, according to a confidential US Nuclear Regulatory report obtained by the New York Times.  The report identifies a wide array of problems including build-ups of hydrogen gas that could cause explosions similar to those that crippled the plant soon after the earthquake.  Workers have begun injecting nitrogen into a reactor to try to stabilize the hydrogen.  Plant owners are also facing the problem of how to dispose of millions of gallons of radioactive wastewater – they’ve been dumping it into the ocean for several days now.  Voice of America reports the dumping will continue until at least Friday.

(click link for audio/news.Also for Radio news USA)

Tokyo Electric Power Co. finally succeeded in stopping the main leak of highly radioactive water from the damaged Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant into the ocean Wednesday morning and workers were preparing to inject nitrogen into at least one reactor in a bid to prevent another hydrogen explosion

Tepco said it confirmed at 5:38 a.m. that a crack in the No. 2 reactor storage pit had been plugged after workers injected 1,500 liters of sodium silicate and another agent to solidify a layer of small stones under a cable trench.

“I have been told that it is being thoroughly looked into whether the leak has completely stopped and whether there are other (cracks),” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said. “We have not stopped worrying just because the leak supposedly stopped.”

The highly radioactive water is believed to have come from the No. 2 reactor core, where fuel rods have partially melted, and ended up in the pit. The pit is connected to the No. 2 reactor turbine building and an underground trench connected to the building, both of which were found to be filled with high levels of contaminated water.


JapanRadioactive Water, Threatens U.S. Tuna-Live Video.

Alpha Decay of Americium-241 to Neptunium-237. Adapted from Alpha Decay.



Beta Decay

Alpha Decay of Hydrogen-3 to Helium-3. Adapted from Stability of Nuclei.

    • Although a dose of just 25 rems causes some detectable changes in blood, doses to near 100 rems usually have no immediate harmful effects. Doses above 100 rems cause the first signs of radiation sickness including:

      Doses of 300 rems or more cause temporary hair loss, but also more significant internal harm, including damage to nerve cells and the cells that line the digestive tract. Severe loss of white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against infection, makes radiation victims highly vulnerable to disease. Radiation also reduces production of blood platelets, which aid blood clotting, so victims of radiation sickness are also vulnerable to hemorrhaging. Half of all people exposed to 450 rems die, and doses of 800 rems or more are always fatal. Besides the symptoms mentioned above, these people also suffer from fever and diarrhea. As of yet, there is no effective treatment–so death occurs within two to fourteen days.

      In time, for survivors, diseases such as leukemia (cancer of the blood), lung cancer, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, and cancers of other organs can appear due to the radiation received

      .Effects of Radiation Exposure on Human Health


Japan dumps Nuclear Toxic Water into Sea-Health Effects,Video.

Bottom line is no body is sure how the radio active waste shall affect marine Life and Environment.

They just make a general assertion that the effects will be minimal with out any supporting evidence and no one has determined what the ‘Safety Limits’of radioactive materials dumped in the ocean are.

Japan, with no other options in sight is forced to dump Nuclear waste into the sea, treaties notwithstanding.

The Effects to So Sea water and the effect it will have on ground water level nobody knows.

We have created the Nuclear Monster,let us suffer from it.


Tokyo Electric Power Co. on Monday began releasing 10,000 tons of low-level radioactive water from the Fukushima No. 1 power plant into the Pacific Ocean on Monday evening to help accelerate the process of bringing the crippled complex under control.

The radical step was taken to make room for the more radioactive water that is being pumped out of the No. 2 reactor’s turbine building.

The utility also said it plans to release 1,500 tons of radioactive water being stored under the No. 5 and No. 6 reactors, which have been safely shut down.

The government said dumping the water will pose “no major health risk” and is inevitable in order to rescue the plant.

Tepco will try to minimize the environmental impact of the dump by setting up an underwater silt fence similar to an oil fence outside the seawater intake near the damaged No. 2 reactor, where toxic water is already leaking into the sea from a cracked storage pit.


Radioactive Waste Dumping.

Greenpeace first encountered a vessel routinely and deliberately dumping radioactive
waste at sea, approximately 400 miles South West of Cornwall in July 1978. The area
had been specified by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), an off-shoot of the
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), as the designated
dumpsite of the western European nuclear industry. The Greenpeace ship Rainbow
Warrior found the Gem, a vessel chartered annually by the UK Atomic Energy Authority
(UKAEA) to dump so-called low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from
medical and military establishments and nuclear power plants.
Since its early days, in the late 1940s, the nuclear industry had chosen the oceans as a
convenient place to dispose of its inconvenient wastes. The USA, the then USSR, France,
the United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden and other states used the sea as a radioactive
dump, both in the Pacific and the Atlantic, and they were determined to continue.

The Oslo Convention was the first regional treaty to regulate the dumping of wastes at
sea – it was negotiated in 1972 by the countries bordering the North-East Atlantic. The
nuclear industry successfully blocked efforts to include radioactive wastes within the
auspices of the convention. Consequently, while the Convention regulated the dumping
of sewage sludge, dredging spoils, and organohalogen compounds (amongst others) for
almost twenty five years, the signatory nations had no right to even comment on the
dumping of radioactive wastes. Yet, paradoxically, the OECD/NEA designated dumpsite
for radioactive wastes was inside the area covered by the Convention.
A few months later in 1972 the negotiations on the London Dumping Convention were
concluded. This was the first global treaty to regulate the dumping of wastes at sea. This
time the negotiations were less dominated by the Western European nuclear states, and,
as a result, the dumping of so-called high-level radioactive wastes was banned.

The first reported sea disposal operation of radioactive waste was carried out by the USA in 1946 in the North-East Pacific Ocean and the latest was carried out by the Russian Federation in 1993 in the Japan Sea/East Sea. During the 48 year history of sea disposal, 14 countries have used more than 80 sites to dispose of approximately 85 PBq (1 PBq = 1015 Bq) of radioactive waste (Fig. 10).


Radioactive Rain in United States, video.Rain Water banned in Japan.

East Coast tests found iodine-131 from Japan in rainwater; California results due out in coming days.

Adithya Sambamurthy/The Bay Citizen
The storms that hammered the Bay Area last week may have carried radioactive contamination from Japan



Rain falling on the United States contains radioactive material from Japan at levels that exceed federal safety thresholds.

Federal officials on Tuesday urged calm in the wake of the discovery of iodine-131, which blew across the Pacific Ocean from the stricken Fukushima nuclear power plant, in rainwater.

The tests that detected the radioactive material were conducted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and by nuclear power plant operators in Pennsylvania.

Test results for California have not yet been released, so it’s impossible to assess the exact dangers here. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans to publish those results within the next day or so, according to Mike Bandrowski, chief of indoor air and radiation for the EPA’s Region 9, which includes California.

Source: The Bay Citizen (


Even as the market has now apparently fully priced in Fukushima, the bad news continue coming:


No surprise there: by now everyone is well aware that the fuel rods are if not completely then certainly partially destroyed. However, the real danger, and explains why we have been following atmospheric conditions over Japan so closely, is that as Kyodo just reported, the rain is now pouring radioactive cats and dogs. But the most troubling development is that instead of being proactive and finally warning its citizens about the dangers, the Japanese government has just raised the decontamination threshold by nearly 20 times from 6,000 cpm to a stunning 100,000 cpm. Is is rather safe to assume that this number was not picked arbitrarily.

From Kyodo:

Far greater amounts of radioactive iodine and cesium were found in rain, dust and particles in the air in some areas over a 24-hour period from Sunday morning due to rainfall, the science ministry said Monday.

”Considering the results of a separate test, radioactive materials in the air and drinking water are confined to levels that would not affect health,” an official of the Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology said. ”The impact on agricultural crops needs to be examined mainly by the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry.”

In a notice to the nation’s 47 prefectures, the health ministry called on local governments on Monday to advise residents to stop giving babies water in forms such as baby formula if radioactive iodine is found in drinking water at levels greater than 100 becquerels per kiloliter.

”Babies can easily absorb radioactive iodine in their thyroid glands,” a ministry official said, explaining the reason for issuing the notice. The intake limit set by the central government is 300 becquerels per kiloliter of water.

The science ministry said separately traces of the substances were detected in drinking water sampled Sunday in nine prefectures but they were all below the intake limits set by the government.

The nationwide survey showed both radioactive iodine and cesium were found in Ibaraki, Tochigi and Gunma prefectures, while iodine alone was found in Saitama, Chiba, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Niigata and Yamanashi.

In Fukushima Prefecture, where the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is located, the prefectural government said 23 becquerels of iodine was found per kiloliter of water.

Yamanashi appeared in the latest iodine list, after not being listed in the previous survey based on samples taken Saturday.

Rainwater banned at water plants

Airborne contaminants tainting tap water supplies, health ministry says

The health ministry has instructed water purification plants nationwide to temporarily stop taking in rainwater to prevent tap water being contaminated from radiation leaking from the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, ministry officials said Sunday.

While calling on the plants to keep tap water supplies stable, the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry also proposed covering the water pools at the plants with tarps to keep rainwater out or using powdered activated carbon to help get rid of radioactive materials. The instruction came after abnormal radiation levels were found in tap water at multiple purification plants in Fukushima, Tokyo and other prefectures.




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