First Recorded Solar Eclipse 5077 BC Ramayana Not 1223 BC


One can see the double standards followed in academic circles,when it comes to Indian history.

Indian history is treated as Myth while,those other than this, is considered as facts!

This approach is not restricted to Indian historical events,but also to events referred to in Indian texts

Whether it be the presence of Hinduism in Sumeria Minoan Aztecs,Incas,Hitties,Ur civilizations or natural events described in Indian texts.

The great floods referred to in Puranas, especially in Bhagavatha Purana and Tamil classical literature.

Also the trade relations between India and what is the rest of World today,much before even Bible was composed.

First eclipse recorded.image.
Sky map during Kara Dushana vada, Ramayana

And the funniest thing is that the so called historians even deny natural event like the earliest Eclipse of the Sun recorded.

One would find that the earliest Solar eclipse recorded was in March /May 1223BC.

1223 BC: The oldest eclipse record

The oldest eclipse record is found on a clay tablet uncovered in the ancient city of Ugarit, (in what is now Syria), with two plausible dates usually cited: 3 May 1375 BC or 5 March 1223 BC, the latter being favored by most recent authors on the topic..

The two oldest record of a sunspot observation are found in the Book of Changes, probably the oldest extant Chinese book, compiled in China around or before 800 BC...
The text reads “A dou is seen in the Sun”, and A mei is seen in the Sun”. From the context, the words (i.e., chinese characters) “dou” and “mei” are taken to mean darkening or obscuration.

Astronomers at the court of the Chinese and Korean emperors made regular notes of sunspots, most less elliptical than the one cited above. It seems, however, that observations were not carried out systematically for their own sake, but instead took place whenever astrological prognostication was demanded by the emperor. The surviving sunspots records, though patchy and incomplete, covers nearly 2000 years and represents by far the most extensive pre-telescopic sunspot record.

Sunspots are concentrations of strong magnetic fields piercing the solar photosphere. Visually, they look like dark blemishes on the solar disk (see slide 1 and slide 3 of the HAO slide set). Most sunspots are too small to be readily visible by naked eye observations, but some reach a size sufficient to be visible without a telescope, under suitable viewing conditions (for example, when the sun is partially obscured by fog or thick mist, or clouds). Because of their possible astrological significance, reports of naked-eye sunspot observations are indeed to be found in many ancient chronicles and court chronologies.

References and further reading:

Mossman, J.E., 1989, A comprehensive search for sunspots without the aid of a telescope, 1981-1982, in Quarterly J. R. Astr. Soc., 30, 59–73.
Stephenson, F.R. 1990, Historical evidence concerning the Sun: interpretation of sunspot records during the telescopic and pre-telescopic eras, in Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London, A330, 499-512.
Hetherington, B. 1996, A chronicle of pre-telescopic astronomy, John Wiley and Sons.

Citation.

https://www2.hao.ucar.edu/Education/solar-physics-historical-timeline-1223-BC-250-BC

Another reference is taken to Aristotle.

Point is Aristotle refers to India.

And Indian texts refer to Eclipses that took place much earlier.

On Julian August 11 afternoon, a solar eclipse begins 20 minuets before sunset and it is still on going at sunset. Fourteen days later (On Julian August 25) in the evening at sunset a lunar eclipse is already occurring. It clearly suggests that eclipse started on the 13th day after the previous eclipse! Obviously the end of lunar and start of solar eclipses were less than 14 days period, or occurred in 13 days. This could be concluded without the benefit of modern clocks.
The dates of this eclipse pair are Julian 3129 and Julian month of August. In ancient Bharata, since the full moon occurred on Proshtapada, the month would be considered as Bhadrapada. Normally, this is the monsoon rainy season in North India. However, there are many occasions when monsoon fails. The epic states that draught like conditions existed. Even during normal monsoon the sky is occasionally clear for the eclipses to have been witnessed.
The first and oldest eclipse pair from 3129 BC is unique. Aryabhata estimated that Kaliyuga started in 3102 BC. So does Surya Siddhanta. These fit the Puranic description that Sri Krishna passed away in 3102 BCJ, which is 27 years after the war. Our study confirms that Kaliyuga could have started in 3102 BCJ.

The second date 2559 BCJ is also unique in that Varaha Mihira stated that 2526 before start of Saka, Yudhishtira was the ruling king. If it Saka was Vikrama it would makeYudhistira as king in 2583 BCJ, which is before Mahabharata War. Yudhistira was also king for a short time before war, before he lost it in a game of dice to Sakuni/Duryodhana. This date is also an excellent candidate for Mahabharata war. There is another event that occurs in 2559 BC. While the eclipse pair occurred in lunar month Shravana, there is another short solar eclipse in Pushya. On 13th day of Mahabharata war, it is said that Jayadhratha was killed when Sri Krishna covered the sun for a short time just before the sunset. This event could be looked upon as a solar eclipse. A study of year 2559 shows that another solar eclipse did occur in Pushyalunar month (Julian)

Citation.

https://www.boloji.com/articles/1052/dating-mahabharata

Eclipse reference in Ramayan.
Ramayan refers to the solar eclipse at the time of war with Khar-Dushan in later half of 13th year of Shri Ram’s stay in the forests. Valmiki has also mentioned that it was Amavasya day and planet Mars was in the middle. When this data was entered, the sky view generated by computer software indicated that there was a solar eclipse on 7th October, 5077 BC (Amavasya day) which could be seen from Panchvati (20° N; 73° E) (Fig. 2). On that date planetary configuration was the same as has been described by Valmiki i.e. Mars was in the middle; on one side were Mercury, Venus and Jupiter and on the other side were Sun, Moon and Saturn.

https://ramanan50.wordpress.com/2013/05/04/ramayana-data-tools-for-dating-proof/

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