442 Liters Water for One Liter of Coca Cola The Water Crisis Story


Which is the cheapest toilet cleaner?

What is a very crude, cheap and dangerous method of Abortion?

Coca Cola.

And it uses enormous amount of water to produce this unhealthy and dangerous drink.

I am providing authentic details on this and the reply by Coca Cola.

Only way to close it down is to boycott it as only lack of demand would force it down.

Coca cola Water usage.image
Coca Cola depltes water sources.

 

The Water Foot Print Network has estimated that it takes 442 liters of water to make one liter of Coca-Cola using cane sugar, and 618 liters of water to make one liter of Coca-Cola product using High Fructose Corn Syrup.

These astounding numbers are not factored into the water replenishment announcement, and Coca-Cola’s claims fall flat if they were to be included – as they ought to be. The numbers used for their announcement are about 200 times less than the actual water footprint of Coca-Cola products.

No more pumping of depleted aquifers!

Coca Cola water usage
Coca Cola water resources

One of the continuing challenges being faced by communities across India is that the Coca-Cola company has continued to operate its bottling plants in severely water-stressed areas, as well as propose new plants in water-stressed areas where the communities have very limited access to potable water – a fundamental human right.

Any company that wants to establish itself as a responsible user of water would begin by not operating in water stressed areas, a demand that has been made of Coca-Cola but which the company seems to ignore because it will deprive it of profits and access to markets.

Coca-Cola is in the habit of making tall claims and generating false opinions favorable to its own cause, whether it is on water use or public health, and this announcement on water replenishment is just that. Just last week, the company was exposed for setting up a front group, Global Energy Balance Network, to confuse the science around obesity.

Attempting to confuse and mislead regulators and scientific opinion is not new to Coca-Cola. In 2006, one of Coca-Cola’s lobbyists in India admitted that his job “was to ensure, among other things, that every government or private study accusing the company of environmental harm was challenged by another study.”…

Water Neutrality?

The myth of ‘water neutrality’

The suggestion that the world’s largest beverage company can become “water neutral”, as Coca-Cola has suggested, is impossible and deceptive, as the India Resource Center has pointed out in the past. It is not possible for a company whose primary raw material is water, to have ‘neutral’ impact on water resources.

Such a disingenuous suggestion by the world’s largest beverage company is a disservice to the public, and without admission of the massive impact the company has on water resources, there can be no genuine discourse with Coca-Cola on water management.

The company’s claims of having ‘neutral’ impact on water resources are misleading for two principal reasons.

First, water issues are local in their impact unlike, for example, climate change. When Coca-Cola extracts water from a depleted aquifer in Varanasi or Jaipur, the impacts are borne by the local communities and farmers that depend upon it to meet their water needs.

Replenishing an aquifer hundreds of miles away from the point of extraction, as Coca-Cola has often done to ‘balance’ their water use, has no bearing on the health of the local aquifer which Coca-Cola depletes through its bottling operations, nor the privations suffered by those who depend upon it.

Second, the amount of water used to make Coca-Cola products, referred to as the ‘water footprint’, is much more than the water used in the bottling plants. Cane sugar is a major component of Coca-Cola products in India, and as one of the largest procurers of sugar in India, Coca-Cola is well shy of achieving any balance with the water used the production of its sugar sweetened beverages.’

( source.  http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-privatization-of-water-in-india-how-cocacola-destroys-the-aquifer/5472625 )

What is Water Footprint?

The water-footprint concept was coined in 2002 by Arjen Hoekstra, a professor of water management at University of Twente in the Netherlands. Using data from the U.N.’s Food and Agricultural Organization, Mr. Hoekstra and other researchers gauged the water content that went into the making of various products and applied those statistics to people’s consumption patterns to get a rough water footprint for average individuals and nations as a whole.

‘HCCB bottles 65% of the company’s total volume in India. Coca-Cola India supplies concentrate to all bottlers and is responsible for marketing, strategy and research & development.

The company’s brands in India include Coke, Sprite, Minute Maid juices and Kinley water. The formula for Coke is a highly guarded secret. The proposed sale of the bottling business marks a reversal of the strategy at the time of Coca-Cola’s return to India in 1993 after a 17-year absence.

.. Read more at:

Soft drinks market is estimated at 14,000 Crores and the market growth is estimated at 39% per annum.
 Misleading investors.

‘Coca-Cola is misleading investors about potential financial and criminal actions against the company in India, according to campaigners.

Last month, a government-appointed committee in the State of Kerala published a report recommending that Coca-Cola pay $48 million for damage caused by its bottling plant in the village of Plachimada.

The committee, which included heads of Kerala’s Agriculture, Groundwater, Health and Pollution Control Departments, said the company unlawfully depleted groundwater, polluted water resources and could face criminal charges on top of a financial penalty.

However, at Coca-Cola’s AGM in Atlanta this week, CEO Muhtar Kent said accusations against the company were ‘unfounded and false.’

‘There have been several scientific studies and litigation on the allegations that Coca-Cola depleted water and contaminated the environment but none, I repeat none, concluded that the Coca-Cola company or any of its bottlers were the cause,’ said Kent.

He also said the call to pay damages was ‘simply a recommendation from a committee’ and that Coca-Cola would ‘rigorously defend any actions that result.’

Forced closure

A spokesperson for Coca-Cola has since said that any government committee or panel reviewing claims ‘should first determine through an established process of law whether any damage was caused to the residents of Palakkad, and second, if such damage was caused, who was responsible’.

The spokesperson continued: ‘It is unfortunate that the committee in Kerala was appointed on the unproven assumption that damage was caused, and that it was caused by Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages.’

Campaigners say they still believe the company could be forced to pay damages and close some of the 56 bottling plants it operates across India.’

Coca Cola statement on water usage.
‘Our systemwide water efficiency has improved for 13 consecutive years. When we started this journey in 2004, we were using 2.7 liters of water to make 1 liter of product. That means that 1 liter of water is in the product and another 1.7 liters is used in the manufacturing process, mostly for keeping equipment clean. Today, we’re using 1.98 liters of water to make 1 liter of product and we’re working to reduce it to 1.7 liters of water per liter of product (a 25 percent improvement) by 2020. But what does that mean?

In 2015, we used about 300.19 billion liters of water to produce approximately 151.1 billion liters of product (e.g., Coca-Cola, Diet Coke and Coke Zero) that we sold to consumers in more than 200 countries and territories around the world. That means 151.1 billion liters of water goes into our products and to consumers. And we used 149.09 billion liters of water in our manufacturing process to make that 151.1 billion liters of product in our operations.1 So, that’s the definition of water efficiency – how much water it takes to make our product.

Our systemwide water efficiency has improved for 13 consecutive years. When we started this journey in 2004, we were using 2.7 liters of water to make 1 liter of product. That means that 1 liter of water is in the product and another 1.7 liters is used in the manufacturing process, mostly for keeping equipment clean. Today, we’re using 1.98 liters of water to make 1 liter of product and we’re working to reduce it to 1.7 liters of water per liter of product (a 25 percent improvement) by 2020. But what does that mean?

 In 2015, we used about 300.19 billion liters of water to produce approximately 151.1 billion liters of product (e.g., Coca-Cola, Diet Coke and Coke Zero) that we sold to consumers in more than 200 countries and territories around the world. That means 151.1 billion liters of water goes into our products and to consumers. And we used 149.09 billion liters of water in our manufacturing process to make that 151.1 billion liters of product in our operations.1 So, that’s the definition of water efficiency – how much water it takes to make our product.
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One thought on “442 Liters Water for One Liter of Coca Cola The Water Crisis Story

  1. I am saying from the beginning. Kick out both Coca Cola and Fanta from India. I am not drinking any of their product. But the Governments, both in Center and States are loath to take any action . May be they are in the Payroll.

    Like

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