Homer’s Odyssey Is Valimiki Ramayana?

In my search o find Sanatana Dharma presence throughout the world,I often stumble upon interesting information by scholars of various countries.

They come from a background which may not have exposed them to our Ithihasas, Puranas and Vedas.

In such cases these scholars present their facts as their culture and literature.

Lord Rama's Coronation.jp
Rama Pattabishekam

I have been able to link their information with our texts and shown that it was Sanatana Dharma which was present and later adopted y the people of the area.

In this way I have been able to unearth a lot of information and have written articles on them.

Caspian Sea is Kasyap Sagar,

Lake Baikal is Vaikanasa Theertha.

Krishna’s son Pradhyumna built a city in Russia.

River Danube is named after Dhanu, Mother of Dhanavas.

Lord Rama’s Chapel in Ur,Russia.

Russia was called Sthree Varsha.

Homer and Ramayana.jpg Homer and Ramayana.

California id kapila Aranya where Sage Kapila turned Sagara’s( ancestor of Rama)  into ashes.

And we have Mount Ash in USA.

The Pillars of Hercules was erected in honour of Krishna.

Krishna, along with Balarama was worshiped in ancient Greece.

And many more articles.

Please check under Hinduism category.

Or Google the country’s name and ramanan50.

Now I have come across information that Homer Plagiarised and produced his Odyssey from Valmiki Ramayana.!

In the adaptation of Homer, Rama is Ulysses – a married king who abandons his wife Penelope, first throughout the campaign of Troy, and then for many years of wandering, from bed to bed, from heart to heart and from bad to worse. The Greek people have a good laugh, the sages blanched. For those who had kept the memory of the great Ram, ridiculing its fascinating and terrible saga was a crime, at least a serious lack of taste. The memory of the great Ram was already fading among the Greek.

“On 16th April, 1178 BC, a solar eclipse occurred and is believed to have marked the return of Odysseus, legendary King of Ithaca, to his kingdom after the Trojan War. He discovered a number of suitors competing to marry his wife Penelope, whom they believed to be a widow, in order to succeed him. He organized their slaying and re-established himself on the throne. The date is surmised from a passage in Homer’s Odyssey, which reads, “The Sun has been obliterated from the sky, and an unlucky darkness invades the world.” This happens in the context of a new moon and at noon, both necessary preconditions for a full solar eclipse. Further clues from the text included reference to Venus being visible and high in the sky six days before, and the constellations Pleiades and Boötes both being visible at sunset 29 days before.”

This odd text contradicts itself from the second line. How could this eclipse marked the return of Ulysses, called “legendary king of Ithaca”? If Ulysses is legendary, why look for vain traces of his existence? Ulysse has replaced Rama, and this eclipse marked the sudden return of Ram after his wars of conquest in Asia. Rama found his Western Kingdom in the hands of unworthy suitors. He resumed his throne, restores ramaic order, and returns to manage the other kingdoms that comprise his global empire, ie Egypt and Middle East, India and China, Central and South America”

Please read my Post Ramas Empire covered the world.

Ramayana Odyssey Similarities.

In the course of a conspiracy hatched by jealous queen ‘Kaikei’, Prince Rama of the kingdom of Ayodhya is expelled. The queen’s initial plan is to bring her own son Bharatha to kingship. Prince Rama leaves the palace with his beloved wife Sita and Prince Lakshmana and lives in the jungle. Valmiki illustrates Rama’s exploits and heroism in the jungle and how Rama battles with ‘Rakshas’ (the jungle dwellers).

Ultimately Ravana, the chief of the jungle dwellers tactfully removes Rama from his jungle home and abducts Sita to Sri Lanka. Rama, accompanied by Hanuman the general of apes and Lakshmana, pursue Ravana in his flight to Lanka. Hanuman builds a type of massive bridge across the sea with boulders and Ravana is killed in the fierce battle that ensures. After testing Sita’s chastity by fire, Rama takes Sita back to Ayodhya and coronation of Rama in the kingdom takes place amidst festivities.

We see that legends of Ramayana have been woven around true events at the time when Indo-Europeans were crossing the valleys of river Ganges. Ramayana describes a period of time which was extremely similar to the period which Homer of Greece described. On the other hand, Homer composed his epic ‘Odyssey’ to illustrate the life and heroic battles by Odysseus, the hero, who ultimately wins his beloved Penelope, identically enough, Ramayana eulogises Rama’s feats in his attempt to save Sita in captivity.


In Odyssey, Homer represents battles, heroic deeds and events which bear clear resemblance to those illustrated by Valmiki in Ramayana. A hero named Odysseus who comes for the battle of Troy from the country of Ithaca, is imprisoned by a marine mermaid in an island on his return journey. All Greeks believe that Odysseus must have died on his return from the battle.

But his beloved girl Penelope earnestly believes that he is alive and totally unaware of his imprisonment, waits for him for years.

Gods are in favour of this imprisonment because the hero Odysseus blinded the chief of the one-eyed giants in their island. Later, the Gods entreat Calypsio the marine mermaid to release Odysseus and he returns to his country after numerous hardships and adventures.

His beloved Penelope is being troubled by suitors (Princes) in Odysseus absence but she stays vehement in her rejection. Ultimately the hero (Odysseus) kills the Princes and recovers the kingdom. (Here Penelope has been constantly supported by Telemachus her son).

In Odyssey, the hero is supported by his son, Coronos and gods just as Rama is strengthened by Hanuman and Lakshmana in Ramayana. Like Penelope in Homer’s work, Sita, perfect in chastity, expects Rama always beside her and regards him as her sole protector and lover. When Rama is expelled into the jungle, she passionately exclaims.

A married woman is always by her husband’s side and regards him more important than house work… As any objects is accompanied by its shadow, so is the woman to her beloved husband… So please allow me to find him in the agreeable jungle and enjoy his warmth and love which are far more dignified than luxuries in this palace…”




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