British Coronation Chair Simhasana With A Cut Shiva Linga

The British Coronation Chair is Hindu Simhasana with a Portion of Shiva Linga

This is called King Edwards’ Chair

This is in Westminster Abbey.

King Edwards' Chair .image.jpg.
The British Coronation Chair Photosavailable at: http://]

he British coronation chair in Westminster Abbey in London. It has lions at its four legs. (Only two front ones are seen in this photo.) This is because England’s royal tradition is of Hindu origin. A Hindu king has to be crowned on a Simhasana, i.e. a Lion’s Seat. The almond-colored square stone (seen in the shelf under the seat) is an ancient Hindu memento carried from Delhi, i.e. Indraprastha by Hindu warriors when they first set up throne in the distant British isles.

[The following is a different caption under a replica copy of the same photograph in the album.]

It is no coincidence that this coronation chair of British royalty in Westminster Abbey, London, is literally a Lion’s seat (simhasan) as it is called in Hindu tradition. A cutpiece of an ancient Shiva Lingam serving several vicissitudes may also be seen reverently placed in the compartment under the royal seat. The sacred stone is known as the Stone of Destiny (Bhagyavidhata) alias stone of Scone (because it was brought from a church in the city of Scone in Scotland, to London in 1296 A.D.). But before being brought to Scotland, it was at the Hill of Tara (Taragarh) in Ireland. Thus, these two, i.e. the Simhasan & Shiva Lingam reaching back into immemorial antiquity, are significant proof of Britain having once been a Hindu country ruled by Hindu Kings. The lions are also of the Burmese and Mysorean Hindu design.( )

Buddha seated ina Simhasanasculpture.image.jpg
Buddha seated in a Simhasana.


Buddha was Siddhartha, a Prince by Birth.

“King Edward’s Chair, sometimes known as St Edward’s Chair or The Coronation Chair, is the throne on which the British monarch sits for the coronation. It was commissioned in 1296 by King Edward I to contain the coronation stone of Scotland — known as the Stone of Scone — which he had captured from the Scots who had kept it at Scone Abbey. The chair was named after Edward the Confessor, and was kept in his shrine of St Edward’s Chapel at Westminster Abbey.

The British version of the chair

Since 1308, all anointed sovereigns of England (until 1603) and Great Britain (after the Union of the Crowns) have been seated in this chair at the moment of their coronation, with the exception of Queen Mary II (who was crowned on a copy of the chair).[1] The last occasion was the coronation of Elizabeth II in 1953.

The high backed gothic style arm chair was carved in 1297 from oak by a carpenter known as Master Walter, who was paid the considerable sum of 100 shillings for his work, which included gilding and painting the chair. Four gilded lions act as legs to the chair, added in the 16th century and then replaced in 1727. Under the seat of the chair is a platform and cavity which until 1996 contained the Stone of Scone; this has now been returned to Scotland with the provision that it be returned to the chair on the occasions of future coronations.

What is a Scone?

one of Scone, also called Stone of Destiny, Scottish Gaelic Lia Fail,  stone that for centuries was associated with the crowning of Scottish kings and then, in 1296, was taken to England and later placed under the Coronation Chair. The stone, weighing 336 pounds (152 kg), is a rectangular block of pale yellow sandstone(almost certainly of Scottish origin) measuring 26 inches (66 cm) by 16 inches (41 cm) by 11 inches (28 cm). A Latin cross is its only decoration.

According to one Celtic legend the stone was once the pillow upon which the patriarch Jacob rested at Bethel when he beheld the visions of angels. From the Holy Land it purportedly traveled to Egypt, Sicily, and Spain and reached Irelandabout 700 bc to be set upon the hills of Tara, where the ancient kings of Ireland were crowned. Thence it was taken by the Celtic Scots who invaded and occupiedScotland. About ad 840 it was taken by Kenneth MacAlpin to the village of Scone.

At Scone, historically, the stone came to be encased in the seat of a royalcoronation chair. John de Balliol was the last Scottish king crowned on it, in 1292, before Edward I of England invaded Scotland in 1296 and moved the stone (and other Scottish regalia) to London. There, at Westminster Abbey in 1307, he had a special throne, called the Coronation Chair, built so that the stone fitted under it. This was to be a symbol that kings of England would be crowned as kings of Scotland also.”

On Christmas morning 1950 the stone was stolen from Westminster Abbey by Scottish nationalists who took it back to Scotland. Four months later it was recovered and restored to the abbey. In 1996 the British government returned the stone to Scotland.


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