Murugan A Vedic God Harappan Tamil Script Proves

I have posted earlier that Murugan is Not a Tamil God.


I have also posted with references that the Sanatana Dharma originated in the South.


Vaivastha Manu migrated from the South,to North, Saraswathi Valley, because of Tsunami.


Lord Murugan Tiruchendur.jpg


Lord Shiva, Ganesha and Murugan migrated through the Arabian Peninsula to the West.


In their mission of dividing Indians , the British rewrote History through self-styled researchers like Caldwell and other covert,:German Missionaries like Max Mueller,


The same thing happened in Tamil, an ancient Indian language.


Tamil along with Sanskrit was in use in Bharat.


To divide the people by Aryan Dravidian Theory,Murugan, a Vedic God Skanda was turned into an independent Tamil God by misinterpreting and in some case by out right lies.


The finding of Tamil Script in Harappa and Sarswathi Valley, the Vedic seals in Arikkamedu and Adicha nallur in Pondicherry,Tamil Nadu nail the mischief.


In addition the ideograms of the Indus Script confirms that Murugan is a Vedic God.

Harappan Script for Murugan.gif.
Parpola has proposed reading a pair of signs as ‘bangles + squirrel’ (Fig.III b), interpreting it as a divine title. The second sign appears to depict a small animal perched on a tree branch. Parpola has, in my opinion, convincingly shown that this animal is the striped palm squirrel shown in its characteristic posture of hanging upside down. Two faience figurines of the palm squirrel have been found at Mohenjodaro. The Tamil word for squirrel is anil (*canil). This loveable creature is often endearingly referred to as anil pillai (pillai being the general term for ‘young one’). Parpola suggests that pillai by itself can mean ‘squirrel’ and the usage may go back to Proto-Dravidian as indicated by the words warce, verce (Gondi) and pirca (Parji) which mean ‘squirrel’ and are, according to him, cognates of pillay, Thus he reads the pair of signs as muruku pillay taken as referring to the god Murukan with the title pillay. Pillai is attested in Tamil as an appellation of Murukan, as the son of Siva.
Parpola departs in this case from his own rules of rebus, which require the finding of another meaning for the same word ( * canil), and not for an associated term ( * pillay). Further as far as I know, there seems to be no attested usage in Dravidian for pillay by itself to mean ‘squirrel’. The suffix pillai is added in Tamil to a wide variety of words to indicate the ‘young of the species” and not specifically or even mainly to the squirrel. As regards the Gondi and Parji words for ‘squirrel’ cited by Parpola, the suggested derivation from * pillay is not supported by regular phonetic correspondences.

3.2 As seen earlier, the two defining characteristics of the pictorial depictions of the Harappan deity are (a) a skeletal body, and (b) bent and contracted posture. The Dr. etyma with the nearest meanings are as follows.34

(a) ‘To be shrivelled‘ (DEDR 4972):

Ma. muratuka: to shrivel; muraluka: id., decay.

Ka. muratu, murutu, muruntu: shrink, shrivel.

Tu. muruntu: shrunk, shrivelled.

Nk. mural: to wither.

Kur. murdna: to be dried to excess.

(b) ‘To be contracted’ (DEDR 4977):

Ta. muri: to bend; murivu: contracting, fold; muri (nimir): (to stretch by) winding limbs.

Ka. murige: bending, twisting; muruhu: a bend, curve, a crooked object;

Ka. muratu, murutu, muruntu: to be bent or drawn together, state of being contracted.(DEDR 4972).

Tu. muri: curve, twist; murige: twist.

Pa. murg: to be bent; murgal: hunchback.

Ga. murg: to bend; murgen: bent; murug: to bend down.

Go. moorga: humpbacked.

(cf: Pkt. muria: twisted; old Mar. mured: to twist.)

We may infer from the linguistic data summarised in (a) and (b) that PDr. * mur/mur-V is the primitive root from which words with the meanings ‘shrivelled’ and ‘contracted’ have been derived.

3.3 We may now proceed to apply the technique of rebus to try and discover the Dr. homonyms with the intended meanings.

(c) ‘Strong, fierce, wild, fighting‘ (DEDR 4971) :

Ta. muratu: ill-temper, wildness, rudeness; muran: fight, battle, fierceness, strength.

Ma. muran: fight, strength.

Ko. mort: violence (of action); mordn: violent man.

Tu. murle: quarrelsome man.

Te. moratu: rude man.

(d) ‘To destroy, kill‘ (DEDR.4975) :

Ta. murukku: to destroy, kill; murunku : to be destroyed.

Ma. muruka: to cut.

Kol., Nk. murk: to split, break.

Kui. mrupka: to kill, murder.

Kur. murukna: to mangle, mutilate.

Malt. murke: to cut into bits.

(e) ‘Ancient‘ (DEDR. 4969) :

Ta. murancu: to be old, ancient; muri: antiquity.

Kol., Pa. murtal: old woman.

Nk: murtal : old woman.

Go. mur-: to mature.

The two sets of etyma in (c) and (d) taken together indicate that the original name of the deity was something like * mur/mur-V and that his essential traits were those of a fierce god, destroyer or hunter.

3.4 The legends and myths surrounding the deity have become inextricably mixed up and both sets of etyma in groups (a) to (d) apply to him. In short, the deity was both ‘a departed soul or demon’ as indicated by his skeletal body and contracted posture, and also ‘a fierce killer or hunter’ as indicated by the Dr. etyma. Furthermore, the linguistic data in (e) can be interpreted to mean that the deity was considered to be ‘ancient’ even in Harappan times.

3.5 In the concluding part of the Paper, we shall compare the traits of the Harappan Skeletal Deity as revealed by the pictorial depictions and linguistic data summarised above, with those of muruku (Murukan), the primitive god of the Tamils as recorded in the earliest layers of the Cankam poetry.35

3.6 The most striking aspect of muruku is that he had no form; he was a disembodied spirit or demon who manifested himself only by possessing his priest or a young maiden. When muruku possessed him, the priest (velan) went into a trance and performed the shamanic dance in a frenzy (veri atal). When muruku possessed the maiden (anankutal), her mother called in the priest (velan) to perform the veri dance to pacify the spirit and restore the girl to her senses.36

3.7 The second prominent trait of muruku was of a ‘wrathful killer’ indicating his prowess as a war-god and hunter.37

3.8 The only physical traits which may be attributed to the primitive muruku are his red colour (cey) associated with blood and bloody sacrifices, and his spear (vel) associated with killing enemies and hunting animals. As muruku had no material body, these two physical traits are shown to belong to his priest, velan the ‘spear-bearer’ who wore red clothes and offered red flowers in ritual worship involving the sacrifice of goats and fowls. There were no temples in the earliest times, and the worship was carried out in the open field (kalam) before a wooden altar.

3.9 Another very ancient aspect of the worship of Murukan, not alluded to in the Cankam poems, but strongly supported by Tamil tradition, is the ritual carrying of offerings on the kavati (yoke with the offerings tied to the ends by ropes). The Paharpur plaques noticed above may also be compared with the Tamil legends of muruku (the demon) and Itumpan, his kavati-bearing worshipper.38

3.10 Much of the later Tamil literature, and virtually all the Tamil inscriptions and iconographic motifs have been heavily influenced by the Sanskritic traditions of Skanda-Karttikeya-Kumara and have very little in common with the primitive muruku except the name Murukan.39 Even the meaning of his name has undergone a radical transformation from muruku ‘the demon or destroyer’ to Murukan ‘the beautiful one’, consistent with the later notion that gods must be ‘beautiful’ and demons ‘ugly’. As P.L. Samy points out in his incisive study of Murukan in the Cankam works, there is no support for the later meaning in the earliest poems. He derives muruku (Murukan) and murukku ‘to destroy’ from Dr. muru-, and endorses the identification of Murukan with muradeva (a class of demons) mentioned in the Rgveda, as proposed by Karmarkar.40

3.1 1 The muruku of the early Tamil society before the Age of Sanskritization was a primitive tribal god conceived as a ‘demon’ who possessed people and as a ‘wrathful killer or hunter’. This characterisation of the earliest Tamil muruku is in complete accord with his descent from the Harappan Skeletal Deity with similar traits revealed through pictorial depictions, early myths and Dravidian linguistic data.

* I differ with the point 3.1.1 , as the Harappan civilization is from the South.


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