animals, lifestyle

Human Polygamy And Animal Monogamy

No longer can one use the term ‘Behaving like an animal’, in terms of comparing the sexual orientation of the Humans.

Human beings, though, by and large, are Monogamous now, there is still a group that advocate Polygamy  , under the guise of Freedom.

Now look at the behaviour of these animals.

However there are deviants in the animal kingdom too!

Monogamy in animals.

Humans like to think of themselves as a faithful species, but when it comes to true fidelity, many other animals offer better examples of how to keep a relationship together.

Although monogamy and lifelong pair bonds are generally rare in the animal kingdom, there are some animals that pull it off. Scroll down to see great comments from our readers about monogamy … or choose one of the arrows above to see the next animal. (Text: Bryan Nelson)

Monogamy in Animals.

Pair Bonding among Gibbons.

Gibbons are the nearest relatives to humans that mate for life. They form extremely strong pair bonds and exhibit low sexual dimorphism, which means that males and females of the species are of roughly equal size, a testament to the fact that both sexes are on relatively equal footing. The coupled male and female will spend time grooming each other and (literally) hanging out together in the trees. But more recent research has found that these unions are not quite as uncomplicated as once thought. With mates occasionally philandering, and even sometimes dumping a mate, the gibbon mating culture has started to look perhaps a little bit more like ours.

Animal Monogamy.

Swans, Mates for Life.

Swans form monogamous pair bonds that last for many years, and in some cases these bonds can last for life. Their loyalty to their mates is so storied that the image of two swans swimming with their necks entwined in the shape of a heart has become a nearly universal symbol of love. Why birds mate for life isn’t as romantic as it first appears, though. Considering the time needed to migrate, establish territories, incubation, and raising their young, spending extra time to attract a mate would minimize reproductive time.

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