ramanan50

Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Data Stealing Market What They Share About You

In internet, lifestyle on December 27, 2013 at 10:05

When I posted an article about NSA spying and overhearing about 540 Millions Conversations a month, at the back of my mind was the thought, if this were true, there should be people/companies making money out of this.

Data Brokers.

Data Stealing

Yes, I found this out from Pando.-Link provided at the close of this post.

The people who over hear or steal our information, from land Lines, Cell phones, Internet, either by way of advertising solicitations, Tele-calling or simple phishing, they sell this information.

Even giants like Google and Facebook do sell, though they do not admit it in so many words.

Some companies who collect this information call themselves Data Brokers.

They sell this information.

The market? $150 billions.

In 2012, the data broker industry generated 150 billion in revenue that’s twice the size of the entire intelligence budget of the United States government—all generated by the effort to detail and sell information about our private lives.”
— Senator Jay Rockefeller IV

There is also an estimate that the market is $ 200 Billion.

There are 4000 companies which specialize in data broking or put it simply stealing your personal information, though it is illegal.

And for this amount what do they share?

They share your,

Financial History, bank records, bankruptcies,

Purchase pattern,

Your health details including drug addiction, illnesses,medicines taken,if you have been raped, those details,

Read a Sample list at http://www.medbase200.com/updating.html

For instance, if lists of rape victims aren’t your thing, MEDbase can sell dossiers on people suffering from anorexia, substance abuse, AIDS and HIV, Alzheimer’s Disease, Asperger Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Bedwetting (Enuresis), Binge Eating Disorder, Depression, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Genital Herpes, Genital Warts, Gonorrhea, Homelessness, Infertility, Syphilis…

..

MEBbase isn’t the only company exploiting these loopholes. By the industry’s own estimates, there are something like 4,000 for-profit intel companies operating in the United States. Many of them sell information that would normally be restricted under federal law. They offer all sorts of targeted dossier collections on every population segments of our society, from the affluent to the extremely vulnerable:

  • people with drug addictions
  • detailed personal info on police officers and other government employees
  • people with bad credit/bankruptcies
  • minorities who’ve used payday loan services
  • domestic violence shelter locations (normally these addresses would be shielded by law)
  • elderly gamblers..
  •  Source: http://pando.com/2013/12/22/a-peek-into-surveillance-valley/

 

Gravity, Film Review,For The Discerning,

In movies english on October 15, 2013 at 17:19

It is very difficult to take a film based on Space sans gimmicks , laser gun wielding characters and keep the audience engaged for about 140 Minutes.

A Film on Gravity.

Gravity, Movie.

If the story line is about losing oneself cutoff from Communication network from anywhere deep in Space, totally at the mercy of Technology, which can fail against the smallest idiosyncrasies of Nature,,well even imagination is bound to fail.

Yet,Gravity does just that ‘conceptualizing beyond the Human Mind and execution beyond technology, that is Human Creativity plus technology.

One is overwhelmed while rating the film, Rate it the Best for Photography,Special Effects. Editing, Music,Script,Dialogues Acting,Direction,or the Best film of all times in this Genre.

A crew aboard a Mission craft are left stranded in Space because of malfunction and the escape routes are blocked by falling man-made Satellite debris, which cuts off all communications,

How the issue is resolved forms the story.

As I have indicated in my earlier post before viewing the film, one does know how to react when lost in Space when you get disoriented.

What is the frame of reference?

The fear of Death seems trivial when compared to the primordial fear of the vastness of  Space.

The film is both psychological and scientific though not a documentary.

The Director steers clear of commercializing the Movie and at the same has not made this a documentary.

The result is a gripping film with a tight script and excellent acting from Sandra Bullock and George Clooney.

The script, what can one say?

One word ‘outstanding’, scientific, early, dry humor  breezy, all at the same time.

Ina all a film for the discerning .

Only yesterday I was telling my son that my favorite film on any day on Space is  Spielberg’s  Close Encounters of the Third Kind  for its original thought on communication with the extra terrestria,l despite the fact that there have been movies on the subject.

Well, now My favorite has changed-Gravity.

Trivia.

Why does the earth look like Milky way Galaxy in one shot?

Why does Gravity does not get mentioned even once in the Movie?

The film seems to be more about Space than gravity?

is this has been named as Gravity because the tag Gravity is more catchy?

21st Century Phobias Includes Mobiles

In Health on August 27, 2013 at 12:07

Modern Phobias.

Payment Phobia.

The Twenty First Century claims to be the most developed century.

It seems to me that it has the ingredients becoming one on using Technology to lose touch with the Reality called Life and saps your personality,reducing everything to machines and quantitative analysis.

Here is List of the Twenty First Century’s gift of Phobias.

Story:

According to a new study more than half of Brits suffer from nomophobia – an abbreviation of no-mobile-phone-phobia.

But it’s not the only phobia to have been caused by, or worsened by, the pressures of modern living.

We take a tongue-in-cheek look at some other fears and phobias that can be blamed on our 21st-century lives…and how to avoid them.

ANTEFAMAPHOBIA

The fear that people were talking about you but stopped as you entered the room.

An occupational hazard for many bosses…and those who overdo it at the office Christmas party.

AGMENOPHOBIA

The fear that the queue you join will be slower than the other one.

It might be the post office or the airport check-in. But for some people the Sod’s Law of queueing can become a real phobia.

Try employing a “queue dummy” – a friend who stands in the other line, just in case,

ANCRAOPHOBIA

Fear of wind.

Apt to affect teenagers returning to school who have spent the entire summer holiday inside playing on their X-boxes.

Also known to strike users of particularly violent washroom hand-dryers.

CHOROPHOBIA

Fear of dancing.

Teenagers forced to go to wedding receptions with their dads have been recognised sufferers for many years.

But the rise of Youtube-inspired Flashmob routines in shopping centres and railway stations is raising the incidence rate.

ALLODOXAPHOBIA

Fear of opinions.

According to experts it is “associated with previous encounters wherein the person affected has not been able to properly express their opinion” – ie likely to affect previous members of Margaret Thatcher’s cabinet or anyone working for Simon Cowell.

ATOMOSOPHOBIA

Fear of atomic explosions.

Seems perfectly rational to us…..

NUCLEOMITUPHOBIA

Fear of nuclear weapons.

Ditto

ARACHIBUTYROPHOBIA

Fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of the mouth (yes, really).

Don’t eat it. Or smear it on your hips. It ends up there anyway.

EDITIOVULTAPHOBIC

Taken from the Latin words for ‘face’ and ‘book’ it means . . . fear of Facebook.

Or just a fear of having every aspect of your life lived in front of “friends” you’ve never met or would ever want to meet.

CARBOPHOBIA

Fear of carbohydrates.

Once affected only the most obsessive devotes of Mr Atkins and his diet.

Now becoming worryingly prevalent among fans of TOWIE taking regular holidays to Marbella who live by the motto ‘No carbs before Marbs’.

CATAGELOPHOBIA

Fear of being ridiculed.

Easily prevented. Don’t audition for Britain’s Got Talent.

CENOPHOBIA

Fear of empty rooms.

Also easily prevented. Don’t come third in X Factor but insist on pursuing the dream.

AEDIFICATORPHOBIA

Fear of builders.

First identified among home owners in the 1970s conservatory era. Now considered an essential defence mechanism.

CONSECOTALEOPHOBIA

Fear of chopsticks.

Use a fork, stupid. Or have crispy duck pancakes. Or go for an Indian.

CHLOROPHOBIA

Fear of the colour green.

Likely to affect GM crop producers, EU fishermen and anyone employed in the oil industry

CYBERPHOBIA

Fear of computers.

Source and  for More.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/real-life-stories/modern-phobias-new-fears-caused-2227420

3D Printer For Space Pizza

In technology on May 23, 2013 at 20:50

Technology leaping!

3D printer for Space pizza.

Pizza in 3D Printer.

 

NASA has announced that it is funding research into 3D-printed food. Mechanical engineer Anjan Contractor recently received a $125,000 grant from NASA to build a prototype 3D printer with a goal of automating food creation.

NASA’s interest in a 3D food printer is obvious. The space agency hopes that such a system could provide astronauts food during long distance space travel, but the printer’s creator has a much loftier goal of helping to solve increasing world food shortages by cutting down on waste.

Software for the 3D food printer will be open-source, and the hardware is based on the open-source RepRap Mendel 3D printer.

The concept behind the 3D food printer involves using basic “building blocks” of food in replaceable powder cartridges. By combining each block, a wide range of foods should be able to be created by the printer. The cartridges will also have an incredible lifespan of 30 years, which is more than sufficient for long distance space travel.

Contractor will first prove that his system works on a basic level by printing chocolate, then he will begin his project in the next few weeks by attempting to print a pizza.

The printer will first print a layer of dough, which will be cooked while being printed. Then it will mix tomato powder with water and oil to print a tomato sauce. The pizza topping is to be a nondescript “protein layer”.

Source:

http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/20887

 

Stunning Images From Space Photo Essay

In Astrophysics, images on February 11, 2013 at 18:59

These are the images from our known Universe.

Still GOD doesn’t Exist?

Sea Gull Nebula

Wings of the Seagull Nebula This image shows the intricate structure of part of the Seagull Nebula, known more formally as IC 2177. These wisps of gas and dust are known as Sharpless 2-296 (officially Sh 2-296) and form part of the “wings” of the celestial bird. This region of the sky is a fascinating muddle of intriguing astronomical objects — a mix of dark and glowing red clouds, weaving amongst bright stars. This new view was captured by the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Color Crater on Mercury

Though Mercury is not known for having an especially colorful surface, some regions show a strong local contrast in color. Like other craters in Caloris, the interior and ejecta of Atget are darker and bluer than the typical brown volcanic plains. These craters help scientists to get a look at the three-dimensional compositional variations with the Caloris basin, and provide a way to judge the thickness of the volcanic plains (over 2 km here!). North is up in this image. These images were acquired as high-resolution targeted color observations. Targeted color observations are images of a small area on Mercury’s surface at resolutions higher than the 1-kilometer/pixel 8-color base map. During MESSENGER’s one-year primary mission, hundreds of targeted color observations were obtained. During MESSENGER’s extended mission, high-resolution targeted color observations are more rare, as the 3-color base map is covering Mercury’s northern hemisphere with the highest-resolution color images that are possible.

Pretty Veils in Orion

This esthetic close-up of cosmic clouds and stellar winds features LL Orionis, interacting with the Orion Nebula flow. Adrift in Orion’s stellar nursery and still in its formative years, variable star LL Orionis produces a wind more energetic than the wind from our own middle-aged Sun. As the fast stellar wind runs into slow moving gas a shock front is formed, analogous to the bow wave of a boat moving through water or a plane traveling at supersonic speed. The small, arcing, graceful structure just above and left of center is LL Ori’s cosmic bow shock, measuring about half a light-year across. The slower gas is flowing away from the Orion Nebula’s hot central star cluster, the Trapezium, located off the upper left corner of the picture. In three dimensions, LL Ori’s wrap-around shock front is shaped like a bowl that appears brightest when viewed along the “bottom” edge. The beautiful picture is part of a large mosaic view of the complex stellar nursery in Orion, filled with a myriad of fluid shapes associated with star formation.

Spiral Galaxy

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope – with a little help from an amateur astronomer – has produced one of the best views yet of nearby spiral galaxy Messier 106. Located a little over 20 million light-years away, practically a neighbour by cosmic standards, Messier 106 is one of the brightest and nearest spiral galaxies to our own. Despite its appearance, which looks much like countless other galaxies, Messier 106 hides a number of secrets. Thanks to this image, which combines data from Hubble with observations by amateur astronomers Robert Gendler and Jay GaBany, they are revealed as never before. At its heart, as in most spiral galaxies, is a supermassive black hole, but this one is particularly active. Unlike the black hole at the centre of the Milky Way, which pulls in wisps of gas only occasionally, Messier 106’s black hole is actively gobbling up material. As the gas spirals towards the black hole, it heats up and emits powerful radiation. Part of the emission from the centre of Messier 106 is produced by a process that is somewhat similar to that in a laser – although here the process produces bright microwave radiation.

Starburst Galaxy

Starburst Galaxy Messier 82, also known as the Cigar Galaxy, is a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. Starburst galaxies undergo extremely high rates of star formation and are thought to represent a particular phase in a galaxy’s evolution. Because of its excessive star birth, M82 is five times brighter than our own Milky Way galaxy

Haunting Ghost Nebula.

Haunting Ghost Nebula This image was obtained with the wide-field view of the Mosaic Camera on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. vdB 141 is a reflection nebula located in the constellation Cepheus. Sometimes referred to as the ghost nebula, its awkward name is its catalog number in Sidney van den Bergh’s catalog of reflection nebulae, published in 1966. Several stars are embedded in the nebula. Their light gives it a ghoulish brown color. North is down and East is to the right. Imaged August 28, 2009.

Saturn Turbulence

This mosaic of images from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows the trail of a great northern storm on Saturn raging in full force. The contrast in the images has been enhanced to make the turbulent parts of the storm (in white) stand out without losing the details of the surrounding regions. The head of the storm is the set of bright clouds near the left of the image. A clockwise-spinning vortex spawned by the storm shortly after it erupted in early December 2010 can be seen in the middle. The head of the storm moved very swiftly westward, while the vortex drifted more slowly westward.

Two New Views of Andromeda

Top: In this new view of the Andromeda galaxy from the Herschel space observatory, cool lanes of forming stars are revealed in the finest detail yet. Herschel is a European Space Agency mission with important NASA participation. Andromeda, also known as M31, is the nearest major galaxy to our own Milky Way at a distance of 2.5 million light-years, making it an ideal natural laboratory to study star formation and galaxy evolution. Sensitive to the far-infrared light from cool dust mixed in with the gas, Herschel seeks out clouds of gas where stars are born. The new image reveals some of the very coldest dust in the galaxy — only a few tens of degrees above absolute zero — colored red in this image. By comparison, warmer regions such as the densely populated central bulge, home to older stars, take on a blue appearance. Intricate structure is present throughout the 200,000-light-year-wide galaxy with star-formation zones organized in spiral arms and at least five concentric rings, interspersed with dark gaps where star formation is absent. Andromeda is host to several hundred billion stars. This new image of it clearly shows that many more stars will soon to spark into existence. Bottom: The glow seen here comes from the longer-wavelength, or far, end of the infrared spectrum, giving astronomers the chance to identify the very coldest dust in our galactic neighbor. These light wavelengths span from 250 to 500 microns, which are a quarter to half of a millimeter in size. Herschel’s ability to detect the light allows astronomers to see clouds of dust at temperatures of only a few tens of degrees above absolute zero. These clouds are dark and opaque at shorter wavelengths. The Herschel view also highlights spokes of dust between the concentric rings.

Molecular Cloud in Monoceros

Molecular Cloud in Monoceros This image was obtained with the wide-field view of the Mosaic II camera on the Blanco 4-meter telescope at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory on January 11th, 2012. It shows a portion of the giant Monceros R2 molecular cloud. It is a location of massive star formation, particularly in the location of the bright red nebula just below the center of the image. The image was generated with observations in the Sulphur [SII] (blue) and Hydrogen-Alpha (red) filters. In this image, north is to the right, and east is up.

 

Saturn's herding Moons.

Saturn’s Herding Moons The ring-region Saturnian moons Prometheus and Pan are both caught “herding” their respective rings in this image. Through their gravitational disturbances of nearby ring particles, one moon maintains a gap in the outer A ring and the other helps keep a ring narrowly confined. Prometheus (53 miles, or 86 kilometers across), together with Pandora (not seen in this image), maintains the narrow F ring seen at the bottom left in this image. Pan (17 miles, or 28 kilometers across) holds open the Encke gap in which it finds itself embedded in the center. The bright dot near the inner edge of the Encke gap is a background star.

Looking Down at Jupiter.

Looking Down at Jupiter These color maps of Jupiter were constructed from images taken by the narrow-angle camera onboard NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on Dec. 11 and 12, 2000, as the spacecraft neared Jupiter during its flyby of the giant planet. Cassini was on its way to Saturn. They are the most detailed global color maps of Jupiter ever produced. The smallest visible features are about 120 kilometers (75 miles) across. The maps are composed of 36 images: a pair of images covering Jupiter’s northern and southern hemispheres was acquired in two colors every hour for nine hours as Jupiter rotated beneath the spacecraft. Although the raw images are in just two colors, 750 nanometers (near-infrared) and 451 nanometers (blue), the map’s colors are close to those the human eye would see when gazing at Jupiter.

Vesta Crater in 3 D

Vesta Crater in 3D This composite-color view from NASA’s Dawn mission shows Cornelia Crater, streaked with dark materials, on the giant asteroid Vesta. The data were obtained by Dawn’s framing camera during the mission’s high-altitude mapping orbit, about 420 miles (680 kilometers) above the surface. The images were integrated into a mosaic and wrapped on a topographical model of Vesta’s surface.

Source.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/01/space-photo-of-the-day-2/?pid=5940

 

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