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Archive for the ‘human interest’ Category

Child Soldiers Of India

In human interest on December 10, 2014 at 09:09

While the talks of saving children , children being used as bonded labor, Terrorist Groups like LTTE using child soldiers, media India has so far not high lighted the child soldiers of India.

 

 

The information below is based on the Report of the Secretary-General to the Security Council (A/68/878–S/2014/339) issued on 15 May 2014.

The recruitment and use of children, as young as 6 years of age, by Maoist armed groups in India, also known as Naxalites, continued in 2013. Although no disaggregated data on the number of children associated with armed groups in India was available to the United Nations, independent estimates indicate that at least 2,500 children are associated with armed groups in Naxal-affected areas. Notably, Naxalite recruitment also continued to affect girls and women. According to the Ministry of Home Affairs, boys and girls between 6 and 12 years of age were recruited into specific childr…[+]

India Denies that there are child soldiers!

n 2012, another spate of child soldier recruitment was reported from . TEHELKA in its investigation, Why children are picking up the gun (14 July 2012) profiled around 10 cases of abduction that had surfaced in the Imphal valley alone in 2012. Parents alleged that minors are being abducted or lured by rebel groups to be trained as child soldiers. According to Police sources, at least 66 children aged between eight and 17, have been kidnapped and recruited as child soldiers by the rebels in in the past five years.

“The actual number is much higher, but many parents do not report abductions to the police, fearing retribution from the rebel outfits,” says Montu Ahanthem of the Alliance for Child Rights. “A commitment to seek a political solution to end the long-drawn armed conflict, instead of a repressive militarisation policy, is clearly missing on the part of the government, and the children end up as victims. In conflict-torn areas, child rights face extraordinary denial and violation.”

Forget political will to keep children away from armed conflict, it seems New believes in denying that the problem even exists. In 2011, in its first ever report to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, on the ‘Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict’ India categorically stated that the country “does not face either international or non-international armed conflict situation”. The report was prepared by the Union Ministry of Women and Child Development.

The government’s denial of armed conflict involving ‘child soldiers’ recruited by terror groups has irked rights activists.

 

Citation.

Click the first Link for country specific data.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/49BXpi/1jUi$eghD:1V5_lZvq/www.undispatch.com/map-of-the-day-where-children-are-soldiers

http://www.tehelka.com/no-child-soldiers-says-india-truth-says-otherwise/

Where Are These Muslims?

In human interest on September 26, 2014 at 17:50

My father worked in Bodinayakkanur, Tamil Nadu,as a Teacher before he settled down in Srivilliputhur.

 

He served as a Teacher for 35 years.

 

He had a student, Habib, who was a Devout Muslim at Bodinayakkanur.

 

After quite a few years he received a message from Habib that he had become a DEO, District Educational Officer and he would be visiting the school where my father was working,Srivilliputhur.

 

DEOs visit schools to inspect them and as such,schools, especially aided schools are very vigilant and accord all respects to the DEO when he is on Inspection tour.

 

He had informed my mother, not my father, through a messenger , that it had been long since he ate my mother’s food, he would like Ragi Dosa every night and he would be sending a boy to pick it up daily during his stay at the Traveler’s Bungalow.

 

After completing the inspection, he sat with the Headmaster of the school , informed him that he was satisfied with his inspection and he would be leaving.

 

The Headmaster who knew the relationship of the DEO with my father asked hm whether he had visited my Fathers Class.

 

He is reported to have replied that he could not visit his teachers class and he(Habib) was  an example of what a Teacher could do a poor student.

 

Till his untimely demise, he used to come to our Home at least once a year and pay  his respect to my father!

 

I was in Bangalore with three of my friend and we were staying together for about six years.

 

I had/have a friend Syed Siddique.

 

He might even forget the dates of Ramzan and Bakrid, but very sure about Amavasya!

 

He was very much attached to my parents.

 

He used to go to my mother in kitchen and demand food/special dishes and she would oblige him.

 

My father had a stroke and was admitted to a Hospital.

 

Siddique came till the Hospital and refused to come inside the room saying he could not bear the sight of my father lying sick.

 

My father expired the next day.

 

Siddique was nowhere to be found.

 

While we were preparing the body for funeral.

 

He came, inebriated, crying , demanding that he be allowed to carry my father’s body to the cremation ground.

 

The priests objected to this, him being a Muslim.

 

My eldest brother said that Siddique was more attached to our father than us and my father reciprocated that.

 

Siddique carried the body.

 

He vowed that he would not eat non vegetarian food and sop drinking till the thirteenth day ceremony and he stuck to it,

 

When I lost my first wife he was one of the few who was by  side leaving his family commitments and consoled me.

 

Even after 40 years, I can not forget his affection .

 

I am still searching for him for we went our ways because of our profession.

 

He is a native of Chozhachakkaranallur,near Myiladuthurai, en route to Vaitheeswara Koil.

 

I have tried to locate him, in vain.

 

If some one, his children, grand children happen to read this remind ‘Swamigal’, that’s how I used to call him because of his knowledge of Hinduism, or Vellai Iyer is searching for him.

 

Now where are all these Muslims Gone?

 

Are we missing them or they are not showing up?

Help Locate These People?An Appeal

In human interest on July 1, 2013 at 22:49

I posted an article Uttarakhand Floods Helplines Find People.
I received the following message in the form of a comment.?
Will somebody help in locating these people and inform the person who has posted this message?
I am sure some of my readers are tech savvy .
Please help.
Regards.
July 1, 2013 at 22:15 | Edit

My mother and my son an kit meena is missing lived in gram teekamodh nasrullaganj distt sehore mp.if u have any information please call 09826682756 or emailOwais78khan@gmail.com

 

A Look At Self Photo Essay

In Behavior, human interest on April 23, 2013 at 12:09

A woman took photographs of herself and made them Public.

If we can see ourselves (not in the Mirror, though, when alone), as others see us, then most of our impressions, especially vanity will vanish.

I am sure I would not accept Me as I am as such!

Glad that there is no Technology as yet to reproduce Images with our feelings and Thoughts!

Story and Photos.

Like a million other college students on spring break, Jen Davis took a picture of herself and her friends while they were hanging out on a beach.

When she returned to school and developed the film, the results caught her off guard.

The image of Davis, titled Pressure Point, shows her larger, covered body seated on a towel while her thinner friends around her wear bikinis.

“I wanted to make a picture to see what that felt like,” Davis said about the moment on the beach. “I was shocked by the ability I had to kind of freeze that moment, to take a mundane but painful moment that was able to be described in the image.”

After that, Davis spent roughly a decade photographing herself, using her camera to shape her own sense of beauty and as a way to develop her vision as a photographer.

Much of that work included photographing herself in ordinary situations: eating, relaxing, showering, etc. Her self-portraits also explored a private, fantasy space that were inspired by a sense of longing, though Davis explained that the line between fantasy and reality—especially when using photography as a medium—is easily blurred.

“Some of the images are real genuine feelings, and others are things I wanted to experience, and I used the license of the camera. … I wanted to know what it felt like to be held by someone or to be with a man, and the camera allowed me to have that experience,” Davis explained.

The image 4 a.m. (2003), for example, was inspired by a lonely return home after a night with friends, many of whom were in relationships.

“I came home at 4 a.m. and made that picture at that instance of having that empty, yearning feeling,” she said. Fantasy No. 1 shows a similar experience, though this time with a “fantasy” man present.

While she was working on the images, Davis said she never thought about an audience or what it would be like to show the work. When she eventually did start to show it, some of the images were tough for her to share, but the exposure also allowed her to work through that sense of vulnerability and insecurity.

“I was able to deal with the emotion and vulnerable state and release it,” she said. But something else happened during the process: She became upset with herself for not changing her body, and showing her work spurred her to take action.

“It was kind of shocking, kind of painful to look at myself and to see myself evolving and growing and understanding a deeper sense of myself but my body not being able to change after nine years’ time. I was shocked and thought ‘why can’t I take control of my life?’ and I realized I didn’t want to wake up at 40 and be in this body—I wanted to know what it would be like to be in a different body, and that was a painful realization,” Davis explained.

Davis decided to have Lap Band surgery and was surprised at how quickly weight started to come off. And although she thought she would be documenting her physical transformation, she was surprised that suddenly she found herself ignoring her camera. She explained:

“I was catching up on the emotional side of [losing weight] and feeling different in the world. … I wanted to experience what dating was, what it felt like in the world and not use a camera to gain access to anything and I didn’t want it to be a distraction for living in the world.”

Davis eventually began dating a man and only recently took out her camera in order to document the experience.

“Now I want to see what this feels like, so I’ve been shooting myself with him a lot,” she began. “I’m just trying to figure it all out now.”

Self Portrait

4 a.m. 2003 (l) Fantasy No. 1. 2004 Jen Davis

Self portrait.,Jen Davis and Lee Marks Fine Art

Pressure Point. 2002 Jen Davis and Lee Marks Fine Art

Untitled. 2003 (l) Pantyhose. 2007 Jen Davis and Lee Marks Fine Art (2),Self Portrait.

Untitled. 2003 (l) Pantyhose. 2007 Jen Davis and Lee Marks Fine Art (2)

Steve and I. 2006 Jen Davis and Lee Marks Fine Art,Self portrait

Steve and I. 2006 Jen Davis and Lee Marks Fine Art

Untitled. 2013 Jen Davis and Lee Marks Fine Art,self portrait.

Untitled. 2013 Jen Davis and Lee Marks Fine Art

 

Source: http://www.slate.com/blogs/behold/2013/04/22/jen_davis_using_self_portraiture_to_explore_body_image_photos.html

 

 

 

 

With The Last Possession Photo Essay

In human interest, images on March 23, 2013 at 08:56

What is it like to leave everything you have and leave with essential possession?

Photo Essay.

With only an Instrument.

With only an Instrument.

The most important thing Omar was able to bring with him is the axe he holds in this photograph. He used it to cut firewood for cooking and to make small wooden structures where his family could sleep at night, and sometimes to rest for several days at a time, during their journey.

The most important thing Omar was able to bring with him is the axe he holds in this photograph. He used it to cut firewood for cooking and to make small wooden structures where his family could sleep at night, and sometimes to rest for several days at a time, during their journey.

The most important thing Maria brought with her is the jerrycan (water container) that she holds in this photograph taken at Jamam camp in Maban County, South Sudan.

The most important thing Maria brought with her is the jerrycan (water container) that she holds in this photograph taken at Jamam camp in Maban County, South Sudan.

The most important object Howard was able to bring with him is the long knife he holds, called a shefe, which he used to defend his family and his herd of 20 cattle during their 20-day journey from Bau County to the South Sudanese border.

The most important object Howard was able to bring with him is the long knife he holds, called a shefe, which he used to defend his family and his herd of 20 cattle during their 20-day journey from Bau County to the South Sudanese border.

The most important things that Torjam was able to bring with him were the plastic bottles he holds here. One carried drinking water, the other cooking oil. “All I could carry was this, and an axe. We couldn’t bring much, and even had to leave some other old people behind.

The most important things that Torjam was able to bring with him were the plastic bottles he holds here. One carried drinking water, the other cooking oil. “All I could carry was this, and an axe. We couldn’t bring much, and even had to leave some other old people behind.

The most important thing Ahmed was able to bring with him is Kako, his pet monkey. Kako and Ahmed made the five-day journey from Taga to the South Sudanese border together in the back of a truck. Ahmed says he can’t imagine life without Kako, and that the most difficult thing about leaving Blue Nile was having to leave his family’s donkey behind.

The most important thing Ahmed was able to bring with him is Kako, his pet monkey. Kako and Ahmed made the five-day journey from Taga to the South Sudanese border together in the back of a truck. Ahmed says he can’t imagine life without Kako, and that the most difficult thing about leaving Blue Nile was having to leave his family’s donkey behind.

The most important object Dowla was able to bring with her is the wooden pole balanced over her shoulder, with which she carried her six children during the 10-day journey from Gabanit to South Sudan. At times, the children were too tired to walk, forcing her to carry two on either side.

The most important object Dowla was able to bring with her is the wooden pole balanced over her shoulder, with which she carried her six children during the 10-day journey from Gabanit to South Sudan. At times, the children were too tired to walk, forcing her to carry two on either side.

Sri Lankan Refugee

Sri Lankan Refugee

http://www.petapixel.com/2013/03/21/portraits-of-refugees-posing-with-their-most-valued-possessions/

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