ramanan50

Pandyas Tamil Kings Lemuria Continent In Mahabharata

In Hinduism on May 28, 2014 at 18:23

There are references to the Mahabharata in the Tamil Sangam Literature and The Mahabharata refers to the Tamil Kings.

 

Lemuria, Tamil Land Mentioned In Mahabharata.Image.jpg.

Lemuria, Tamil Land Mentioned In Mahabharata.

 

The Tamil King Perunchotru Udiyan Neduncheralathan was the one who fed  both Kauravas and Pandavas during the Mahabharata War.

 

He also had Tharpana performed for those who did in the Mahbharata war in the Chera Kingdom(History of the Tamils by PT .Srinivasa Iyengar)

 

Arjuna and Sahadeva went on a Pilgrimage to the Tamil Kingdoms in the South.

 

There are references to Lord Krishna having been acquainted with the Pandya Kings.

 

Pandya was present in the Rajasuya ceremony of Pandava king Yudhisthira (2:36,43).


The Kings of Chola and Pandya, brought numberless jars of gold filled with fragrant sandal juice from the hills of Malaya, and loads of sandal and aloe wood from the Dardduras hills, and many gems of great brilliancy and fine cloths inlaid with gold. Singhalas gave those best of sea-born gems called the lapis lazuli, and heaps of pearls also, and hundreds of coverlets for elephants (2:51).

 

Bhishmaka, the mighty king of the Bhojas (of Vidarbha Kingdom) who governs a fourth part of the world, by his learning conquered the Pandyas and the Kratha-Kausikas (2:14).

Having met with Rukmi (of Vidarbha Kingdom), Karna, repaired to Pandya and the mountain, Sri. And by fighting, he made Karala Kerala?), king Nila, Venudari’s son, and other best of kings living in the southern direction pay tribute (3:252)

Having brought king Nila of Avanti Kingdom under his sway thus, the victorious son of Madri (Sahadeva) then went further towards the south. He brought the king of Tripura under his sway.

And next turning his forces against the Paurava kingdom, he vanquished and reduced to subjection the monarch thereof. And the prince, after this, with great efforts brought Akriti, the king of Saurashtra and preceptor of the Kausikas under his sway.

The virtuous prince, while staying in the kingdom of Saurashtra sent an ambassador unto king Rukmin, the son of Bhishmaka within the territories ofBhojakata.

And the monarch along with his son, remembering their relationship with Vasudeva Krishna, cheerfully accepted, the sway of the son ofPandu.

He marched further to the south and reduced to subjection, Surparaka and Talakata, and the Dandakas also.

The Kuru warrior then vanquished and brought under his subjection numberless kings of the Mlechchha tribe living on the sea coast, and the Nishadas and the cannibals and even the Karnapravarnas, and those tribes also called the Kalamukhas (dark faced) who were a cross between human beings and Rakshasas, and the whole of the Cole (Chola or Kolwa) mountains, and also Surabhi-patna, and the island called the Copper island, and the mountain called Ramaka.

He having brought under subjection king Timingila, conquered a wild tribe known by the name of the Kerakas.

The son of Pandu also conquered the town of Sanjayanti and the country of the Pashandas and the Karanatakas by means of his messengers alone, and made all of them pay tributes to him.

The hero brought under his subjection and exacted tributes from the Paundrayas (Pandyas?) and the Dravidas along with theUdrakeralas and the Andhras and the Talavanas, the Kalingas and the Ushtrakarnikas, and also the delightful city of Atavi and that of the Yavanas.

And, He having arrived at the sea-shore, then dispatched with great assurance messengers unto the illustrious Vibhishana, the grandson of Pulastya and the ruler of Lanka (2:30).

Vasudeva Krishna slew king Pandya by striking his breast against his, and moved down the Kalingas in battle (5:48). The Cholas and the Pandyas were mentioned as vanquished by Krishna at (7:11).

The mighty Sarangadhwaja, the king of the Pandyas, has white steeds, decked with armour set with stones of lapis lazuli.

 

His country was invaded and his father was slain by Krishna in battle. Obtaining weapons then from Bhishma and DronaBala Rama and Kripa, prince Sarangadhwaja became, in weapons, the equal of Rukmi and Karna and Arjuna and Achyuta.

 

He then desired to destroy the city of Dwaraka and subjugate the whole world.

 

Wise friends, however, from desire of doing him good, counselled him against that course.

 

Giving up all thoughts of revenge, he is now ruling his own dominions. Steeds that were all of the hue of the Atrusa flower bore a hundred and forty thousand principle car-warriors that followed that Sarangadhwaja, the king of the Pandyas, opposing Drona in Kurukshetra War.(7:23).

 

Pandyas were fierce warriors who took part in the Kurukshetra War as per the epic Mahabharata.

They were mentioned both in the epicMahabharata and epic Ramayana.

A Pandya king named Sarangadwaja (alternatively Malayadwaja) is mentioned as participating in the Kurukshetra War, siding with the Pandavas.

It is not clear if Pandyas had any tribal links with the Pandavas of north-India.

This kingdom existed in the southern part of modern day Tamil Nadu state of India, to the south of Kaveri River.

Their capital was Madhura on the banks of the Tamraparni River, which is now known as Vaigai river.

The name Madhura resembles the Mathura of northern India indicative of a connection with the Yadavas who once ruled at Mathura.

Pandyas, Cholas and Keralas were also mentioned in Tamil literature complementing their mention in the Sanskrit literature (constituted by Ramayana, Mahabharata, Puranas and Vedas).

By looking at the descriptions of the land of Tamils, especially of Pandyas, one is made to conclude that this land mass was in the submerged continent of  Lemuria.

Please read my posts ,Million Year Old Tamil Quotes Vedas and They quote Tamil, Lemuria, home of The Tamils in Ramayana Mahabharata.

Citation.

Ancient Voice wikidot.

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  1. Reblogged this on V's ThinkTank.

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