ramanan50

Smritis List Manu Smriti Not For Us

In Hinduism on May 12, 2014 at 18:48

Smritis mean ‘those that are remebered’.

 

These are the orally transmitted Traditions of  Hinduism, some them have been written.

 

 

Religious Texts Of Hindus Chart.Image.jpg.

Religious Texts Of Hindus Chart

In terms of Religious Authority, they are of secondary in nature, the first and foremost being the ‘Sruthi‘,’ The Heard’ by the Rishis form the Ether,   The Vedas.

 

The Smritis function as unwritten code of conduct.

 

They lay down Norms of Behaviour in the Society and also are advisory in Nature to kings and his subjects.

 

 

Smritis also reflect the social Life of the Vedic India down the Ages.

 

There are Eighteen Smritis.

 

These are also called Dharma Sastras,Rules of Righteousness.

 

They are,

Manu,

Yajnavalkya ,

Parasara,

Vishnu,

Daksha,

Samvarta,

Vyasa,

Harita,

Satatapa,

Vasishtha,

Yama,

Apastamba,

Gautama,

Devala,

Sankha-Likhita,

Usana,

Atri and

                                                                                                                                                 Saunaka.



The Laws of Manu are intended for the Satya Yuga,

 Yajnavalkya ,for the Treta Yuga,

Sankha and Likhita are for the Dvapara Yuga and

of Parasara are for the Kali Yuga.

We are familiar with the Manu Smriti, which is not intended for KaliYuga.

Read my Post Manu Smriti not for Kali Yuga.

The Smritis are long treatises in Sanskrit prose.

These were /are transmitted Orally .

To remember, them Hinduism had devised systematic Memorizing Technics called ‘Paatas”

A sample of This procedure,

  • Forms of recitation included the jaṭā-pāṭha (literally “mesh recitation”) in which every two adjacent words in the text were first recited in their original order, then repeated in the reverse order, and finally again in the original order.[9] The recitation thus proceeded as:

word1word2, word2word1, word1word2; word2word3, word3word2, word2word3; …

  • In another form of recitation, dhvaja-pāṭha[9] (literally “flag recitation”) a sequence of N words were recited (and memorized) by pairing the first two and last two words and then proceeding as:

word1word2, word(N-1)wordN; word2word3, word(N-3)word(N-2); …; word(N-1)wordN, word1word2;

  • The most complex form of recitation, ghana-pāṭha (literally “dense recitation”), according to (Filliozat 2004, p. 139), took the form:

word1word2, word2word1, word1word2word3, word3word2word1, word1word2word3; word2word3, word3word2, word2word3word4, word4word3word2, word2word3word4; …Source.Wiki.

 

Citations.

 

http://sivanandaonline.org/public_html/?cmd=displaysection&section_id=572

 

https://archive.org/details/yajnavalkyasmrit00yj

https://archive.org/details/ParasharaSmriti

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  1. Very nicely explained. Thank you.

    Like

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