ramanan50

Language Codes Pilots Use Flying Aircraft.

In Gadgets on October 17, 2013 at 17:41

I am intrigued by the language(?) the Pilots use.

I found an interesting article in the Atlantic.com.

I checked the internet to find out more.

This is the result.

Enjoy.

Codes for Alphabets.

LETTER
A
Alpha
B
Bravo
C
Charlie
D
Delta
E
Echo
F
Foxtrot
G
Golf
H
Hotel
I
India
J
Juliett
K
Kilo
L
Lima
M
Mike
N
November
O
Oscar
P
Papa
Q
Quebec
R
Romeo
S
Sierra
T
Tango
U
Uniform
V
Victor
W
Whiskey
X
X-ray
Y
Yankee
Z
Zulu

What is the meaning of ‘Roger and Out’.

Roger / Wilco / Over / Out / Read / Copy

In the early days when most two-way radio communication used “Morse” code (radiotelegraph), operators used very short ‘procedural’ signals to save time. One such signal was the letter “R”, which was sent to indicate that a message had been received in full. As operators changed over to voice operation (radiotelephone), they kept the same letter, but pronounced it with a phonetic alphabet in which “R” was spoken as “roger“, still indicating that a message had been received. 

Sometimes the radio operator is also the person addressed (for instance, perhaps an aircraft pilot). That person might add the response “Wilco“, which is short for “will comply”. 

Flight Plan.

Aircraft Flight Plan..

The term “over” is used with radio (or even telephone) connections when only one person can speak (successfully) at a time. It means “I have finished speaking for the moment, but am expecting your reply – go ahead”. “Out” means “I have finished speaking, and the conversation is finished; don’t reply”. They are not properly used together. 

Read, as in ‘Do you read me”, refers to hearing a signal clearly enough to be understood. Copy probably originally referred to writing or typing a received message, but now has is essentially the same as ‘Read’. (http://www.dyerlabs.com/communications/procedural_codes.html)

Some conversations by Pilots and their meanings.

For example, when a pilot enters a controller’s airspace, the format is: Greeting. ID. Altitude. Or, as Jim tells me they teach it in pilot school, “Who they are; whoyou are; where you are; [and when necessary] what you want.” Thus:

Pilot: Denver Center. Cirrus 435 Sierra Romeo. Four-thousand five-hundred feet.

And the air traffic controller’s (ATC) response is: Acknowledgment. Altimeter reading (necessary gauge for determining altitude)

ATC: November 435 Sierra Romeo. Denver altimeter  30.14

And so on. Short. To the point. Unambiguous. No small talk to clog up the frequency.

 

Reinvention and resilience across the nation
[But what’s this “November” business? Pilots identify themselves with their type of aircraft (for us, Cirrus) before the “tail number," (for us, 435SR) which is their version of a license plate. In reply the controllers usually start with “November,” which is the phonetic code for N, which is the letter that indicates a U.S.-registered airplane. There are more wrinkles here, but enough for now.]

You might hear a little looser back and forth when, for example, the ATC is inquiring from pilots within his space about favorable altitudes to assign:

ATC: “How’s your ride up there?

Pilots: “Light chop at three-five-zero“ or “Moderate turbulence at 5000 feet.”

Sometimes you hear a request for elaboration. An ATC might request the pilot to “Say type of aircraft,” since there are different types of Cirruses or Cessnas..

Or there might be a request for clarification. One day, I was surprised to realize that a little linguistic tic that I thought my husband had acquired was actually aviation talk for “repeat”.  In place of the more colloquial (at least to me) “What was that?” Or, “I didn’t quite hear you,” or even “Sorry?”  he now says “Say again” in all his normal conversation.  He never said that before he became a pilot.

The variation in style is pretty small:  a grizzled pilot might slur rather than enunciate. A cool one might swagger through litanies like Maverick or Iceman in Top Gun. An old-rules air traffic controller might stick to the absolutely disambiguating pronunciation for, say, distinguishing 9 and 5 with Niner and Fife

Sports fanatics: Near Boston, you have CELTS and BOSOX.  Only in Texas you find:  GOALL, PPUNT, DRPPD, FTBAL,TEXNN, COACH, QTRBK, TAKKL, RECVR, FMBLE and TCHDN. By Soldier Field; KUBBS and BEARS. In DC GIBBZ, SKINS, and MONKK. In Portland, the pair of TRAYL and BLAZR, balanced by the highbrow OMMSI,(Portland’s Oregon Museum of Science & Industry) and POWLZ (the incredible Powell’s Bookstore).

Foodies: Near Kansas City, you get the regional SPICY, BARBQ, TERKY, SMOKE and RIBBS. And in Vermont and New Hampshire,  HAMMM BURGR FRYYS

Guys or maybe Girls (I’m guessing the names are for girlfriends): SUSAN, SUSIE, SUSIQ, SUZAN, SUZEE, SUZEY, SUZIE, SUZIQ, SUZYQ, SUZYY, LIZIE, LIZZE, LIZZY, LIZZZ, ANNEE, ANNEY, ANNNE, ANNII, ANNYE.

Political junkies: By Andrews Air Force Base, you find DUBYA, BUUSH, FORRD, RREGN. No Democrats so far.

Goofballs: Near Pease, NH, there is a famous series of waypoints that read: ITAWT ITAWA PUDYE TTATT IDEED. Read that back, pilot!”

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/10/itawt-itawa-pudye-ttatt-the-secret-language-of-the-skies/280598/

 

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  1. Radio – Telephony ( RT) codes are universal. Our Army & AF too use the same codes while talking over wireless.

    When I heard 9/11 tapes, I noticed that Pilots & ATC do not use feet or metres– Pilot is told to climb to 25 ( meaning 25000 feet) which he copies it & confirms it later after reaching 25000 feet .

    Like

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