ramanan50

Porn Good for Relationships. Porn History.

In Sex on July 19, 2013 at 17:48

Porn is being cited as a reason for the break up of marriages.

It is also cited as the prime cause for Pedophilia.

I have maintained in my posts that Porn may not be the reason for souring relationships.

It is the emotional build up and the anticipation of things to come makes sex interesting .

History of Porn

History of Porn

Human Society has been indulging in Porn watching since ages.

Pornography existed long before Photography was invented.

Sex toys have come a long way since the Stone Age – but then again, perhaps not as much as we might think.

Last week, an excavation in Sweden turned up an object that bears the unmistakable look of a penis carved out of antler bone. Though scientists can’t be sure exactly what this tool was used for, it’s hard not to leap to conclusions. [See "Sex Myths and Taboos"]

“Your mind and my mind wanders away to make this interpretation about what it looks like – for you and me, it signals this erected-penis-like shape,” said archaeologist Göran Gruber of the National Heritage Board in Sweden, who worked on the excavation. “But if that’s the way the Stone Age people thought about it, I can’t say.”

There are references to it in the Legends , even in the Puranas.

All conceivable forms of Perversions were practiced.

Sodomy,Narcissism.were in evidence.

many researchers think evolution predisposed humans for visual arousal (It’s a lot easier to pass on your genes if the sight of other naked humans turns you on, after all). Whichever way you slice it, the diversity of pornographic materials throughout history suggests that human beings have always been interested in images of sex. Lots and lots of sex.

“Sex has always played a super-important role for human beings and their relationships,” said Seth Prosterman, a clinical sexologist and licensed therapist in San Francisco. “What people do sexually has always been a curiosity, and of interest.”

 

The definition of “pornography” is famously subjective. After all, one man’s Venus de Milo is another man’s masturbation aid. But researchers generally define the genre as material designed solely for sexual arousal, without further artistic merit.

By that standard, the first known erotic representations of humans might not be porn, in the traditional sense, at all. As early as 30,000 years ago, Paleolithic people were carving large-breasted, thick-thighed figurines of pregnant women out of stone and wood. Archaeologists doubt these “Venus figurines” were intended for sexual arousal. More likely, the figurines were religious icons or fertility symbols.

Fast-forwarding through history, the ancient Greeks and Romans created public sculptures and frescos depicting homosexuality, threesomes, fellatio and cunnilingus. In India during the second century, the Kama Sutra was half sex-manual, half relationship-handbook. The Moche people of ancient Peru painted sexual scenes on ceramic pottery, while the aristocracy in 16th century Japan was fond of erotic woodblock prints.

In the West, many early explicit materials were political, rather than exclusively pornographic, said Joseph Slade, a professor of media arts at Ohio University. French revolutionaries, in particular, satirized the aristocracy with sexually charged pamphlets. Even the Marquis de Sade‘s famously brutal and erotic works were part philosophical.

“They were political invectives disguised as pornography,” Slade said.

Porn is born

In the 1800s, the idea of porn for porn’s sake began to spread. Erotic novels had been in print since at least the mid-1600s in France (though being identified as the author of one meant a sure trip to jail), but the first full-length English-language pornographic novel, “Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure,” also known as “Fanny Hill”

People go through the database of the grants given by the government and pull things out and say ‘look, the government’s wasting money,’” Rosenbaum says. “The amount of money is small and shrinking.”

Second, there are a whole lot more important drivers that do impact relationships, and the long-term decline of marriage, more than porn. A 2010 paper by the National Bureau of Economic Research identified a host of economic factors as the primary drivers, like technology that makes housework less valuable. Education, actually, is strongly correlated with higher rates of happiness in marriage. So academic researchers aren’t particularly interested in studying the effect of porn on relationships specifically.

“I think that just testing the idea of porn impacting relationships is an intrinsically conservative idea,” Rosenbaum said. “If you went to scholars of marriage and family about the issues that are important, it wouldn’t make their top 20 list.”

And third, for all we know, porn is good for relationships. Bryant Paul, a professor of telecommunications at Indiana University-Bloomington, says that watching porn doesn’t desensitize men to sex; they tend to have fairly insatiable appetites. It’s also reasonable to expect, he says, that viewing porn could give couples new ideas to keep sex fresh, as well as serve as an outlet from the monotony of monogamy without resorting to infidelity.”

http://www.livescience.com/9971-stone-age-carving-ancient-dildo.html#sthash.w3Vpd65L.dpuf

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/07/18/porn-is-everywhere-but-thats-not-whats-killing-marriage/

 

  1. Reblogged this on The Voice Of Australians and commented:
    Great connection, off seeing Porn connected to Pedophilia, Judith Reisman came to the same conclusion when she saw how the Dept Of Justice was using even child porn to create people to who they aren’t.
    The same study has been done on Violent films & Violent Crimes, an the connection their.
    Its pure brainwashing & conditioning & its illegal

    Like this

  2. Terrific post. Throughly enjoyed reading it.

    Like this

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