ramanan50

About NSA , Great Spy Centre.Declassified Documents.

In US on April 9, 2012 at 12:22

National Security Agency(NSA) is relatively less known than its cousins like the CIA.

It is a premier Spying Agency of the USA.

Its major strength is its listening posts, which build up a huge Data Base for Intelligence Analysis.

It closely co ordinates with its major allies MI 5/6 of the UK which has a major facility in Cheltenham for listening in.

Of Course, Mossad also contributes.

NSA can listen in to any communication both on land and Satellite in any part of the world.

CIA is often overridden by the NSA, such is the power of the NSA.

But it keeps a low profile.

NSA can order Satellite  to move to any part of the world.

It also closely coordinates with the Pentagon, US Navy and Marines, not to speak of the US Air Force and the US Army.

People are concerned that it violates individual Privacy guaranteed under the First Amendment to the US Constitution.

It taps communications within the US, though it will never admit it.

It also has an Operations arm that undertakes covert Operations ,including ‘wet ops’

Let us peep into the NSA.

NSA Facilities

NSA Premises.

Under construction by contractors with top-secret clearances, the blandly named Utah Data Center is being built for the National Security Agency. A project of immense secrecy, it is the final piece in a complex puzzle assembled over the past decade. Its purpose: to intercept, decipher, analyze, and store vast swaths of the world’s communications as they zap down from satellites and zip through the underground and undersea cables of international, foreign, and domestic networks. The heavily fortified $2 billion center should be up and running in September 2013. Flowing through its servers and routers and stored in near-bottomless databases will be all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails—parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.” It is, in some measure, the realization of the “total information awareness” program created during the first term of the Bush administration—an effort that was killed by Congress in 2003 after it caused an outcry over its potential for invading Americans’ privacy.

But “this is more than just a data center,” says one senior intelligence official who until recently was involved with the program. The mammoth Bluffdale center will have another important and far more secret role that until now has gone unrevealed. It is also critical, he says, for breaking codes. And code-breaking is crucial, because much of the data that the center will handle—financial information, stock transactions, business deals, foreign military and diplomatic secrets, legal documents, confidential personal communications—will be heavily encrypted. According to another top official also involved with the program, the NSA made an enormous breakthrough several years ago in its ability to cryptanalyze, or break, unfathomably complex encryption systems employed by not only governments around the world but also many average computer users in the US. The upshot, according to this official: “Everybody’s a target; everybody with communication is a target.”

For the NSA, overflowing with tens of billions of dollars in post-9/11 budget awards, the cryptanalysis breakthrough came at a time of explosive growth, in size as well as in power. Established as an arm of the Department of Defense following Pearl Harbor, with the primary purpose of preventing another surprise assault, the NSA suffered a series of humiliations in the post-Cold War years. Caught offguard by an escalating series of terrorist attacks—the first World Trade Center bombing, the blowing up of US embassies in East Africa, the attack on the USS Cole in Yemen, and finally the devastation of 9/11—some began questioning the agency’s very reason for being. In response, the NSA has quietly been reborn. And while there is little indication that its actual effectiveness has improved—after all, despite numerous pieces of evidence and intelligence-gathering opportunities, it missed the near-disastrous attempted attacks by the underwear bomber on a flight to Detroit in 2009 and by the car bomber in Times Square in 2010—there is no doubt that it has transformed itself into the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever created.

In the process—and for the first time since Watergate and the other scandals of the Nixon administration—the NSA has turned its surveillance apparatus on the US and its citizens. It has established listening posts throughout the nation to collect and sift through billions of email messages and phone calls, whether they originate within the country or overseas. It has created a supercomputer of almost unimaginable speed to look for patterns and unscramble codes. Finally, the agency has begun building a place to store all the trillions of words and thoughts and whispers captured in its electronic net. And, of course, it’s all being done in secret. To those on the inside, the old adage that NSA stands for Never Say Anything applies more than ever.

….

For his part, Inglis simply engaged in a bit of double-talk, emphasizing the least threatening aspect of the center: “It’s a state-of-the-art facility designed to support the intelligence community in its mission to, in turn, enable and protect the nation’s cybersecurity.” While cybersecurity will certainly be among the areas focused on in Bluffdale, what is collected, how it’s collected, and what is done with the material are far more important issues. Battling hackers makes for a nice cover—it’s easy to explain, and who could be against it? Then the reporters turned to Hatch, who proudly described the center as “a great tribute to Utah,” then added, “I can’t tell you a lot about what they’re going to be doing, because it’s highly classified.”

And then there was this anomaly: Although this was supposedly the official ground-breaking for the nation’s largest and most expensive cybersecurity project, no one from the Department of Homeland Security, the agency responsible for protecting civilian networks from cyberattack, spoke from the lectern. In fact, the official who’d originally introduced the data center, at a press conference in Salt Lake City in October 2009, had nothing to do with cybersecurity. It was Glenn A. Gaffney, deputy director of national intelligence for collection, a man who had spent almost his entire career at the CIA. As head of collection for the intelligence community, he managed the country’s human and electronic spies.

Within days, the tent and sandbox and gold shovels would be gone and Inglis and the generals would be replaced by some 10,000 construction workers. “We’ve been asked not to talk about the project,” Rob Moore, president of Big-D Construction, one of the three major contractors working on the project, told a local reporter. The plans for the center show an extensive security system: an elaborate $10 million antiterrorism protection program, including a fence designed to stop a 15,000-pound vehicle traveling 50 miles per hour, closed-circuit cameras, a biometric identification system, a vehicle inspection facility, and a visitor-control center.

Inside, the facility will consist of four 25,000-square-foot halls filled with servers, complete with raised floor space for cables and storage. In addition, there will be more than 900,000 square feet for technical support and administration. The entire site will be self-sustaining, with fuel tanks large enough to power the backup generators for three days in an emergency, water storage with the capability of pumping 1.7 million gallons of liquid per day, as well as a sewage system and massive air-conditioning system to keep all those servers cool. Electricity will come from the center’s own substation built by Rocky Mountain Power to satisfy the 65-megawatt power demand. Such a mammoth amount of energy comes with a mammoth price tag—about $40 million a year, according to one estimate.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/all/1

NSA Offcial Site:

http://www.nsa.gov/

Some declassified information from the NSA.

Records Regarding the Assassination of John F. Kennedy
Under the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-526), NSA is required to review all records relating to the assassination and provide copies to the Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB). The Board, in turn, provides copies to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). NARA has over 170,000 records relating to the J.F.K. assassination of which only a small number originated with NSA. The documents listed are the ones released by NSA to date.

The documents marked with * and ** were released directly to NARA in 1993 by NSA prior to the formation of the ARRB. The documents preceded by ** were released under the FOIA in the late 1970’s/early 1980’s, and the copies of the documents appear as they were released to the FOIA requester(s) at that time. Documents released to NARA by the ARRB in August 1997 are indicated by #, documents released to NARA by the ARRB in January 1998 are indicated by ## and documents released to NARA by the ARRB in October 1998 are indicated by ###. XXXXX has been inserted in a title if a portion of the title was deleted prior to release.”

Follow the Link for detailed information on this Subject or any other like Korean War,Vietnam.

http://www.nsa.gov/public_info/declass/jfk.shtml

About these ads
  1. [...] About NSA , Great Spy Centre.Declassified Documents. (ramanan50.wordpress.com) [...]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,926 other followers

%d bloggers like this: