ramanan50

World’s Rudest Nations Ranks.

In lifestyle on April 8, 2012 at 11:30

None is intentionally rude to visitors.

As has been pointed out in the story it might be due to Cultural differences and the apprehension of the locals to be nice.

They end up the  other way.

India ranks at 1.9%

Middle east known for Hospitality is missing.

Australia at  .91% ?

How reliable is this survey?

Story:

Sounding out the top five rudest countries were the UK, Germany and “Other” (those Others are the worst, don’t you think?). The US placed 7th, behind China.

Some of the perceived rudeness may be attributable to cultural differences rather than anything intentional. For example, says Tatiana Danilova, Skyscanner’s Russian Market Manager, “the Russian language is not as polite as English, so when Russians translate directly from Russian to English, it can sound rude to an English speaker even if they don’t mean it to.”

“We were surprised to see Russians come in second place,” says Skyscanner’s Travel Editor, Sam Baldwin. He attributes this in part to the “familiarity breeds contempt” phenomenon. Although Russia doesn’t compare with the Mediterranean as a tourist destination, as visa regulations have relaxed, Russian holidaymakers are increasingly flocking to the Mediterranean and coming into contact with people from other countries.

The same principle may apply to the French: “As our closest neighbors, there has long been a familiar rivalry between the UK and France,” Baldwin says, and the preponderance of responses from the British Isles may have contributed to this result. Still, Baldwin says, “Even the French acknowledge that the way they are perceived is not entirely without basis.” (In France’s defense, I’ve always found Parisians to be just as rude to each other as they are to foreigners. Outside of Paris – and even within the city – people can be as gracious as anywhere.)

The British, for their part, voted themselves “world’s worst tourists” in a previous Skyscanner survey.

The countries rated as having the least rude locals were Brazil, the Caribbean and the Philippines.

Skyscanner claims to be Europe’s leading travel search site, operating in over 25 languages with over 25 million visits and over 11 million unique visitors per month. It has offices in Edinburgh, Scotland and Singapore.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewbender/2012/04/03/the-worlds-rudest-nations-for-travelers/

Here’s the complete list of responses:

Nationality Percentage of votes
French 19.29
Russian 16.56
British 10.43
German 9.93
Other 6.37
Chinese 4.3
American 3.39
Spanish 3.15
Italian 2.24
Polish 2.24
Turkish 2.15
Indian 1.9
Swiss 1.9
Greek 1.74
Croatian 1.57
Austrian 1.41
Cypriot 1.24
Egyptian 1.24
Korean 1.24
Norwegian 0.99
Australian 0.91
Dutch 0.83
Irish 0.83
Swedish 0.83
Japanese 0.66
Danish 0.5
Canadian 0.41
New Zealander 0.41
Indonesian 0.41
Portuguese 0.33
Thai 0.25
Filipino 0.17
Caribbean 0.08
Brazilian 0.08
  1. Yey, sounds good to me. But I agree with you. Some languages are heavily accented and inflected with ‘heavy’ words that might be misconstrued as being rude. I got this experience first hand in Malta. I thought they were trying to shoo me away. Some are just so animated with way too much hand and facial gestures but are actually trying to be helpful. I’m surprised Morocco is not on the list. I’ve had very wonderful experience with Moroccan locals especially when I was asking for directions and alternate off beaten path destinations.

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    • I have a friend who is an Occidental, insists on saying ‘I love You’ to his wife every day.
      Says it helps bonding.
      I opine that such things when expressed to those who are very close to you sounds inane and artificial.

      My son ( who is 32), , when asked why he is so nice to people other than those at home his reply was ‘ Do you want me to act? You are my dad.Why should I not take liberties with you? Why should I be formal?’

      In most Indian homes the relationships are informal, taken for granted(not in the derogatory sense), and vocalisation is considered artificial.
      Your views?

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      • On the much abused ‘I love you’, notice how others used it with much liberty like ‘Oh I love your shoes’. ‘I love your blog’ ‘I love the snot running down your nose’ and the like. Among Italians, if they mean it, they never say the accurate translation ‘Ti amo’. Instead they say ‘Ti voglio bene’.

        Although I have Indian friends and have been hosted by their families in their homes, I’ve nothing to say except that I was, each time, bowled over by their hospitality. Because I could not speak Hindi, Malayalam, Bihari or Tamil, we spoke English all the time and language, vocalization, modulation was never an issue. It was they way they dealt with me.

        I think there is something about culture, the prevailing socio-political climate (like how the US was suddenly extraordinarily xenophobic post-911) that influence, people how they behave -towards family and towards others.

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  2. Some interesting facts. I once worked with a Latvian girl who told me that Latvians think English people strange because they say ‘thank you’ so often and because they ‘sorry’ even if it is someone else’s fault!

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