ramanan50

Examine, Listen and Hear Patient History.

In Uncategorized on August 15, 2011 at 21:14

To day Doctors rely more on Gadgets and High tech instruments for Diagnosis.

For non emergency cases, doctors used to

  • patiently listen to the patients’ expression of symptoms.
  • examine pulse rate.
  • check with Stethoscope.
  • dilate pupils
  • ask the patient about his diet,bowel movement.
  • check the tongue and throat.
  • Check tummy.
  • ask for medications taken.
  • ask those who accompany whether the patient had previous history.
  • ask for family history.

Only then the Doctor starts diagnosing.

Now, after hearing hastily the symptoms, and in certain cases ask the patient what medicine he/she had taken the last time,starts writing a string of medicines and recommend a plethora of tests.

Examining patients and taking a medical history are more useful to hospital doctors in diagnosing patients than high-tech scans, according to a study from Israel.

Tests such as CT scans and ultrasounds add to hospital bills, but doctors said that such tests given right after patients showed up in emergency rooms only helped with diagnosis in roughly one of three cases, the study — published in the Archives of Internal Medicine — said.

There is also research showing that the radiation from multiple CT scans might increase the risk of cancer over the long term.

To see whether such scans were really helpful, researchers led by Ami Schattner of Kaplan Medical Center in Rehovot, Israel, followed all the patients who showed up at the emergency room of a teaching hospital and were subsequently admitted.

“Basic clinical skills remain a powerful tool, sufficient for achieving an accurate diagnosis in most cases,” Schattner and his colleagues wrote.

“Physicians may count more on their clinical faculties when making decisions about patients.”

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/15/us-tests-idUSTRE77E0DL20110815?feedType=nl&feedName=ushealth1100

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,882 other followers

%d bloggers like this: